Department of Physics & Engineering

Program Outcomes, Objectives, and Enrollments

Plan for Implementation of Vision and Mission Statements
From the Fort Lewis College mission statement and the engineering mission and vision statements, the department has developed Program Educational Objectives that our alumni (graduates) should possess and Student Educational Outcomes for our students while engaged in their engineering education.  


Bachelor of Science in Engineering (BSE)

Program Educational Objectives (Alumni working in industry):

  1. Alumni successfully utilize engineering principles for design and analysis as needed by their field.
  2. Alumni consistently exhibit effective communication, teamwork, and ethical behavior as standard practice in the workplace and continue to learn through workplace experiences as well as through formal educational opportunities.
  3. Alumni successfully pursue a broad range of career paths.

Student Outcomes:

a.  An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering.

b.  An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as analyze and interpret data.

c.  An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.

d.  An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams.

e.  An ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems.

f.   An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.

g.  An ability to communicate effectively.

h.  The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context.

i.   A recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in life-long learning.

j.   A knowledge of contemporary issues.

k.  An ability to use the techniques, skills and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Annual student enrollment and graduation data
 Academic Year Total Program Enrollment  Number of Graduates 
2010 - 2011  95 0
2011 - 2012 126  3 
2012 - 2013   180   5 
2013 - 2014   228   

Engineering Physics (EP)

Program Educational Objectives (Alumni working in industry):

The goal of the Engineering-Physics program is to provide a quality scientific and technical education coupled with the unique Fort Lewis College liberal arts general education so that students are prepared to evaluate, understand, and formulate responsible solutions to technical problems within the social and cultural context of today’s complex world. To this end we strive to meet the following objectives

  1. To serve the four corners area with a quality engineering-physics program that attracts regional residents and helps them to succeed – especially Native American students, in a manner consistent with the long-standing tradition at Fort Lewis College.
  2. To give our students the ability to apply scientific and engineering principles to identify, formulate, and solve problems in analysis and design. In this pursuit, our students will need to understand the basis of modern engineering tools and the role of experimentation, and how to apply these methods appropriately.
  3. To train our students to work collaboratively and communicate effectively, particularly in the context of multidisciplinary design problems.
  4. To prepare our students to pursue careers and advanced degrees in a variety of traditional and non-traditional engineering fields. To this end, we will instill in them a recognition of the need to continue learning throughout their careers, and the confidence to do it.
  5. To provide students with an understanding of the professional and ethical responsibility engineers have to society, and teach them to recognize that there are societal impacts of engineering solutions.

Student Outcomes:

    a.  An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering.

    b.  An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as analyze and interpret data.

    c.  An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.

    d.  An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams.

    e.  An ability to identify, formulate and solve engineering problems.

    f.   An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.

    g.  An ability to communicate effectively.

    h.  The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context.

    i.   A recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in life-long learning.

    j.   A knowledge of contemporary issues.

    k.  An ability to use the techniques, skills and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Annual student enrollment and graduation data

 Academic Year Total Program Enrollment  Number of Graduates 
2003 - 2004 3  1
2004 - 2005 15  1
2005 - 2006 14  3
2006 - 2007  23   4
2007 - 2008 31  4
2008 - 2009  37   3
 2009 - 2010  47  4
2010 - 2011  40   6
2011 - 2012 30 11
2012 - 2013  25 1
2013 - 2014  31  


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