Department of History

Dr. Michael Fry, Professor

Office: 205 Noble Hall

Office phone: 970-247-7352

Email: fry_m@fortlewis.edu

Office hours: TBA

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Fall 2012 Semester Courses

HIST 270: Colonial Latin America
Mon/Wed/Fri  12:35--1:45 p.m.,  160 Jones Hall

An overview of important historical trends in Spanish and Portuguese America that focuses on the cultural developments that resulted from the contact and integration of European and American civilizations in the 16th century. The course particularly emphasizes sectors of colonial society that have continued to play a vital role, thus setting the stage for an examination of the events and conditions that led to the movements for independence in the early 19th century and the formation of the modern nations of Latin America.


HIST 373: History of Mexico
Mon/Wed/Fri  10:55 a.m.--12:05 p.m.,  220 Center of Southwest Studies

This course will closely examine the major social, economic, political, and intellectual developments in Mexico from the late 15th century to the present. The class begins with a brief introduction to the ancient cultures of Mexico, with special emphasis on the classic civilizations of the central valley of Mexico and on the social, economic and political climate of the Aztec empire on the eve of the arrival of the Spanish conquistadores. Much attention will be given to the cultural and political developments that resulted from the contact between the Hispanic and Indian civilizations. An examination of the colonial period will focus on those sectors of society that have continued to play a vital role into the present and on the significance of the changes that accompanied the transition from Hapsburg to Bourbon rule in the 18th century. Particular stress will be placed on the liberal political and economic philosophies and programs of the 19th and eary 20th enturies that eventually resulted in the era known as the Porfiriato. A large portion of the class will be devoted to a study of the Mexican Revolution of 1910 and its lasting effects on Mexican society today. Finally, the present and future of Mexico will be discussed in terms of its internal dynamics and of its relations with the United States and the rest of the world.

Previously Taught Courses

HIST 150: Survey of World Civilization I
History of world civilizations from the beginning of time through to c. 1500.

HIST 270: Colonial Latin America
An overview of important historical trends in Spanish and Portuguese America that focuses on the cultural developments that resulted from the contact and integration of European and American civilizations in the 16th century. The course particularly emphasizes sectors of colonial society that have continued to play a vital role, thus setting the stage for an examination of the events and conditions that led to the movements for independence in the early 19th century and the formation of the modern nations of Latin America.

History 271: Latin America Since Independence
This course examines the major social, economic, political, and cultural institutions and systems in Latin America from the late 18th century to the present. The class is organized along two broad and significant themes. On the one hand, a major theme is the Latin American search, during the past two centuries, for a viable model for economic and political development: liberalism, conservatism, positivism, import substitution industrialization, social democracy, and Marxist-Leninism. On the other hand, a parallel theme is that Latin American political and economic institutions have developed in response, not only to the demands of local and global pressures and conditions, but to the organizing principles of Latin American Culture. As the culturally-specific goals of Latin Americans differ radically from those of North Americans, you will no doubt become more conscious of the motivating principles of your own culture.


History 371: History of Central America
A close examination of Belize, Guatemala, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Honduras and Costa Rica since the late 15th century. Some time is spent on the pre-conquest period, but most of the course focuses on.aspxects of colonial society still vital in the present, the aftermath of political independence from Spain, the prominent role of British and North American interests, unique economic developments within each country, and the revolutionary turmoil of the late 20th century.
 

History 372: U.S.-Latin American Relations
An overview and analysis of the historical developments of political and economic relationships between the United States and Latin America since the late 18th century. The course focuses on United States policy toward the rest of the western hemisphere and the reactions of various countries and regions of those policies. Particular emphasis is given to the Latin American movements for independence, United States-British rivalry in the Caribbean, the Mexican War, United States economic expansion in the late 19th century, the Spanish-American War, the Panama Canal, United States involvement in the Mexican and Cuban revolutions and the effects of the Cold War on relationships among the countries of the Americas.

HIST 373: History of Mexico
This course will closely examine th major social, economic, political, andintellectual developments in Mexico from the late 15th century to the present. The class begins with a brief introduction to the ancient cultures of Mexico, with special emphasis on the classic civilizations of the central valley of Mexico and on the social, economic and political climate of the Aztec empire on the eve of the arrival of the Spanish conquistadores. Much attention will be given to the cultural and political developments that resulted from the contact between the Hispanic and Indian civilizations. An examination of the colonial period will focus on those sectors of society that have continued to play a vital role into the present and on the significance of the changes that accompanied the transition from Hapsburg to Bourbon rule in the 18th century. Particular stress will be placed on the liberal politcial and economic philosophies and programs of the 19th and eary 20th enturies that eventually resulted in the era known as the Porfiriato. A large portion of the class will be devoted to a study of the Mexican Revolution of 1910 and its lasting effects on Mexican society today. Finally, the present and future of Mexico will be discussed in terms of its internal dynamics and of its relations with the United States and the rest of the world.

HIST 375: Latin America Topics: Film and Fiction

HIST 375: Latin America Topics: Latin America Today

HIST 375: Latin America Topics: Ancient America

HIST 375: Latin America in Historical Fiction
 

History 396: Philosophy and Methods

An introduction to the study of history, this course serves as the upper-division Writing Course for the History Department. The course explores the ways historians, past and present, think about and practice the craft of writing history. It introduces students to new fields of historical research and multi-disciplinary approaches to the past. Special emphasis is placed on developing skills necessary for becoming successful writers in the field. This course is required for all majors and should be taken in the second term of the sophomore year or during the junior year.

HIST 496: Research Senior Seminar
In this course, students produce an original historical research project based on skills acquired and preparations made in HIST 396. The Research Senior Seminar is a capstone course. At the end of the term, each student will have a thoughtfully written and carefully polished Senior Thesis (sophisticated, historical research paper). In addition, each student will share the thesis and central arguments/ideas of their research in a public presentation and defense.