Maximizing Access to Research Careers Program

Pre-MARC Mentors

Dr. David Blake, Professor of Biology

See Faculty Mentors page for description.

Dr. Bill Collins, Professor of Chemistry

Phone: (970)-247-7133
Email: Collins_W@fortlewis.edu

Education:
B.S., 2003, New Mexico Institute of Technology, Socorro
Ph.D., 2009, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Postdoctoral Fellow, 2009-2011, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge

MARC Involvement:
During the 10-week, 2012 summer research period Khalyd Clay and Dr. Collins investigated whether it was possible to synthesize a variety of dye molecules. The two projects that this research focused on were: 1) the direct, synthetic incorporation of trifluoroborate functional groups onto the leukoindigo dye scaffold, and 2) the synthetic preparation of electron-rich aromatic dyes for intermolecular encapsulation studies with tetracationic iodonium macrocycles.

Dr. Sue Kraus, Professor of Psychology

See Faculty Mentors page for description.

Dr. Erin Lehmer, Professor of Biology

See Faculty Mentors page for description.

Dr. Aimee Morris, Visiting Instructor of Chemistry

Phone: (970)-247-7635
Email: Ammorris@fortlewis.edu

Education:
B.S., 2004, Western Washington University
Ph.D., 2009, Colorado State University
Neuro-postdoctoral fellow, 2009-2010, Brandeis University
Adjunct Faculty, 2010-2011, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences
Faculty Associate, 2011-2012, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

MARC Involvement:

Dr. Morris is currently working with a Pre-MARC student to develop a new pathway for the synthesis of the cobalt(III) coordination complex, [CoIII(pyridine)4Cl2]Cl .  Historically, chlorine gas has been used during the synthesis process both to oxidize the Co(II) starting material and to add the chlorine counterion.  Chlorine gas is highly toxic and corrosive.  Dr. Morris’s research group proposes using a hydrogen peroxide solution to synthesize [CoIII(pyridine)4Cl2]Cl. The synthesis of the counterpart cobalt II coordination complex, trans-[CoII(pyridine)4Cl2], using an established technique from the literature, will also be undertaken.  Once synthesis of both complexes are complete, they plan to work on obtaining physical measurements.  In the future, Dr. Morris’s group plans to use both complexes as teaching tools in inorganic lab courses, as they demonstrate synthetic techniques, varying oxidation states of metals, symmetry, ligand field theory, and diamagnetic vs. paramagnetic coordination complexes.

Dr. Sharon Sears, Professor of Psychology

See Faculty Mentors page for description.

Dr. Les Sommerville, Professor  and Chair of Chemistry

See Faculty Mentors page for description.

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