theMOLE - Math Online Learning Experience

Online Statistics Resources

[link] Online tutorial for picking the correct statistics test. This website is basically a clickable flowchart. It is designed to walk you through your research design so that you will end with the appropriate inferential statistics.

[link] Website for the textbook Essentials of Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences by Susan A. Nolan and Thomas E. Heinzen. Math 201 (Elementary Statistics) instructors may require this textbook. The website contains a helpful glossary and questions that check your understanding of statistics concepts.

[link] QuickCalcs, which is a GraphPad software. This website contains easy-to-use statistics "calculators," meant for researchers with summarized means, counts, or small amounts of raw data. It also calculates the p-value from z, t, F, r, or chi-square and vice versa. And it also produces random numbers for random selection or random assignment to groups. It has some chemical and radiochemical data calculation applications (e.g., molar solutions, moles, grams).

[link] Random Number Generator

[link] Background information regarding effect size measures

[link] OnlineStatBook. This website contains great simulations and demonstrations to better understand statistics concepts.

[link] Website with various statistics applets. This is another resource that you can refer to for visually demonstrations of key statistics concepts.

[link] Conventional print tables of critical values of t and chi-square. These tables are useful if you do your statistics by hand. Or if you would like to determine what the exact cut-off t score or chi-square your study requires.

[link] Normal Curve Probability Calculator:   p or p to Z calculator that gives you p for below/above/between scores and lets you enter either the original scores (mean, SD, target score) or the Z score.

[link] Look up the p-value for known statistics values, such as z, t, chi-squre, r, and F. These tables are useful if you do your statistics by hand. Or if you would like to determine what the exact cut-off t score or chi-square your study requires.

[link] Look up the critical value of chi-square. This website lets you visualize the area under the sampling distribution for your chosen degrees of freedom (df). This is a useful resource if you do your statistics by hand. Or if you would like to determine what the exact cut-off chi-square your study requires.

[link] Look up the critical value of t. This website lets you visualize the area under the sampling distribution for your chosen df. if you do your statistics by hand. Or if you would like to determine what the exact cut-off t score your study requires.

[link] Look up the critical value of F. This website lets you visualize the area under the sampling distribution for your chosen df. if you do your statistics by hand. Or if you would like to determine what the exact cut-off F-ratio your study requires.

[link] Look up power and sample sizes. This website is a collection of applets, some of which are easier to use than others. It is useful for researchers who would like to determine how many participants they will need if they wish to achieve a particular statistical power.

List compiled by Dr. Beverly Chew.

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