Fort Lewis College News

News at Fort Lewis College

On-campus garden grows food know-how

There are good things growing on campus. And you can see some of that goodness just north of the Center of Southwest Studies. There, you'll find a quarter-acre garden offering up a widely varied harvest of home-grown organic bounty. There is also a three-season greenhouse, several hoop houses and cold frames, a compost facility, and a 100-tree dwarf apple orchard nearby.

The Eco-Demonstration Garden is a project of the Environmental Center's Local Food program. The garden gives students the chance to learn sustainable gardening practices while producing their own food in a unique and creative growing environment featuring a range of eco-friendly gardening techniques.

This year's harvest yielded tomatoes, string beans, potatoes, peppers, kohlrabi, carrots, beets, turnips, squash, pumpkins, cucumbers, snap peas, garlic, lettuce, arugula, chard, kale, spinach, raspberries, strawberries, watermelon, and more, as well as an assortment of hops, herbs, and wildflowers.

“Our garden is a student-initiated and student-managed project, so it's about getting people involved here and now making a positive impact,” says EC Coordinator Rachel Landis. “But the whole point is to get students in there learning about food production. That way, it also provides them with the skills they need so that, after they leave FLC, they can continue to build upon what they learned.”

The garden dates back to 2001, when the EC established a campus plot, adding a greenhouse in 2006, next to what was then the College Union Building. In 2009, when the CUB was renovated and expanded into the present Student Union, the garden project was relocated to its present location, amidst the sage and other native vegetation in the College's designated natural area north of the parking lot off Talon Drive.

When the garden is in production during the school year, students and EC staff manage the site, and volunteer work days welcome anyone who wants to help. In the summer, two students earn stipends for managing the garden.

“A food system is production, harvesting, and then, ultimately, distribution and access. So, this little mini-garden model represents what we’re trying to do on a larger scale in our community, and someday in the world,” says Landis.

Learn more about the FLC Environmental Center.

Learn more about how Fort Lewis College is going green.

Drew Walters, an FLC student, is one of the main caretakers for the Environmental Center's Eco-Demonstration Garden. Though he knew very little about gardening before starting in the garden, you certainly wouldn't know it now.

Drew Walters, an FLC student, is one of the main caretakers for the Environmental Center's Eco-Demonstration Garden. Though he knew very little about gardening before starting in the garden, you certainly wouldn't know it now.

Small garden, big goals. The garden incorporates a vast array of advanced techniques -- such as companion planting and season extension -- on to a compact, easily manageable site.

Small garden, big goals. The garden incorporates a vast array of advanced techniques -- such as companion planting and season extension -- onto a compact, easily manageable site.

 Sustainability is a huge part of the garden's culture. Here, an old shoe organizer is re-purposed into a hanging planter.

Sustainability is a huge part of the garden's culture. Here, an old shoe organizer is re-purposed into a hanging planter. 

 The garden also has a greenhouse. Tomatoes and delicious herbs flourish in this space.

The garden also has a greenhouse, located nearby. Tomatoes and delicious herbs flourish in this space despite cool temperatures. 

Student gardeners try innovative planting techniques. Here, old tires are used as potato planters -- a technique that is especially valuable for urban gardens.Student gardeners try innovative planting techniques. Here, old tires are used as potato planters -- a technique that is especially valuable for urban gardens.

The garden is open daily to visitors. Self-guided tour signs explain the intricate, advanced processes and techniques that help keep the garden running smoothly.The garden is open daily to visitors. Self-guided tour signs explain the intricate, advanced processes and techniques that help keep the garden running smoothly.

The garden incorporates a number of techniques to protect it from wildlife -- including the classic scarecrow.The garden incorporates a number of techniques to protect it from wildlife -- including the classic scarecrow.

The garden employs numerous methods to minimize its impact, showcasing what can be accomplished with specialized tools in a limited space.The garden employs numerous methods to minimize its impact, showcasing what can be accomplished with specialized tools in a limited space.

Cold nights? No problem. The innovative student gardeners have it all figured out.Cold nights? No problem. The innovative student gardeners have it all figured out.

Almost there ... Who's hungry?Almost there ... Who's hungry? 

Return TopTrackbackPrintPermalink
Comments are closed for this post, but if you have spotted an error or have additional info that you think should be in this post, feel free to contact us.