X
[EasyDNNnews:IfNotExists:Image]

Monday, February 27, 2017

[EasyDNNnews:EndIf:Image]

Geologist shows gratitude to FLC with research fund [VIDEO]

Alumnus Peter Mesard says he chose to attend Fort Lewis College because of the outdoors—the skiing and the mountain climbing, especially. But his academic experience is what stuck with him, so much so that he has established the Peter Mesard Undergraduate Research Fund for present and future FLC students.

Mesard (Geology and Engineering, ’76) also made a five-year pledge to support construction of FLC’s new Geosciences, Physics & Engineering Hall, which opened its doors in Spring 2017. To show appreciation, FLC named the GPE Hall’s Peter M. Mesard Mineralogy & Petrology Laboratory in his honor.

“I am so grateful and thankful for the experience I had at Fort Lewis,” says Mesard,  the principal engineer at Exponent Engineering & Scientific Consulting in Oakland, California. “The very quantitative engineering side of things, and the less quantitative, more observational skills you develop as a geologist, were just a fantastic meld, and I think that combination has really served me well in my career.”

“When I got out of college, the environmental consulting business was almost nonexistent,” he says of his current career path. “All that I had to learn to develop expertise in this area, I learned using the tools I learned at Fort Lewis.”

That innovative career has taken Mesard far afield from Durango, but his heart is still at FLC, he says. He still recalls a bittersweet moment during the graduation ceremony in April 1977.

“The last day before I had to drive to the airport, I walked around the rim of the mesa, like I used to do, just crying my eyes out,” he says. “I just could not believe I was going to leave Durango. I could have very happily stayed there my whole life.”

Mesard may reside in California now, but thanks to his passion for undergraduate research, his name and his contributions will live on at FLC for generations of students to come.

Number of views: 34234

Tags: engineeringgeologycareeralumni

Name:
Email:
Subject:
Message:
x
Photographer goes where no one has caved before [PHOTOS]

Photographer goes where no one has caved before [PHOTOS]

First ascents tend to capture popular imagination. But not many people get known for their first descents. So photographer Stephen Eginoire recognizes just how rare it is that he gets to be the first human being to step into caves unseen by human eyes or trod by human feet in Grand Canyon National Park.

Exercise Science cohort learns on the ropes

Exercise Science cohort learns on the ropes

This fall, the Exercise Science Learning Community traveled to Farmington, New Mexico, for a half-day high ropes challenge. There, the students practiced teambuilding exercises with the same peer group that takes several core classes together as a cohort.

Professor’s interactive map illustrates national monument proposal

Professor’s interactive map illustrates national monument proposal

The recent announcement by the Department of the Interior that it proposes to reduce the size of Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments in Utah is one of the most high-profile changes to public lands in recent history. And Jon Harvey, assistant professor of Geosciences, is helping the public and his students understand those changes through interactive GIS maps.

RSS
12345Last