Office of Student Success - Free Electives for Fall

Important Dates

  • Tuesday, May 15 (Census Date)
    • Deadline to add or drop summer courses 
    • Deadline for dropping individual course without a recorded grade
  • Deadline to withdraw from an individual summer course
    • See the Registrar's Website (dates vary per course)
  • Sunday, August 26th
    • Last day to withdraw with no academic financial penalty (other fees may still apply)
  • Monday, August 27th
    • Fall classes begin   
  • Tuesday, September 11th (Census Date) 
    • Deadline to add or drop fall courses
    • Deadline for dropping individual classes without a recorded grade
    • Deadline for Application for Graduation 

Free Elective Options for Fall 2018

Free electives are courses outside your major, minor, and Liberal Arts Core. These are classes that count towards your overall graduation total but do not have to lead to higher coursework and are not required for your degree path.

The first list is classes that do not have prerequisites or class standing requirements. These classes are for any students needing a free elective in the Fall 2018 semester. You can click on the class to see a summary, the number of credits you'll earn from the class, and any other notes or extra information.

The second list is classes that have prerequisites, class standing requirements, or a more advanced courseload. These classes are primarily for upperclassmen (juniors and seniors) unless you have fulfilled the requirements of the class you're interested in. You can click on the class to see a summary, the number of credits you'll earn from the class, the required prerequisites, and any other notes or extra information.

Not sure if a free elective is the right choice for you or will fit with your schedule? Schedule an appointment with your advisor or stop by Walk-In Advising to talk about your options.

Lower division coursework, no prerequisites

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ANTH 151 - Introduction to Anthropology

ANTH 151 - Introduction to Anthropology

This course provides a comprehensive introductory study of general anthropology covering the four major subfields (biological, linguistic, archaeological and sociocultural). It also addresses the ways that knowledge gained in the four subfields may be applied to solving real-world problems.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring
Notes: This class also counts as a Liberal Arts Core Social Science (SS) course.

ANTH 171 - World Prehistory

ANTH 171 - World Prehistory

Students study the fundamental role that technology, as evidenced in the archaeological record, has played in the evolution of humans, from the earliest hominids to the rise of states in the Old and New Worlds. The interconnection between technology and society is emphasized, as is the scientific method and its historical and cultural contexts.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall

ANTH 190 - Visualizing Culture

ANTH 190 - Visualizing Culture

Using ethnographic and documentary film as a lens on the world, the course critically examines the concepts central to the discipline (gender, environment, culture, labor, etc) and evaluates how visual representation constructs or destabilizes cultural understanding. A wide range of films will be viewed and understood through guided reflection, discussion, and in written assignments.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Fall 2018

ANTH 201 - Introduction to Archaeology

ANTH 201 - Introduction to Archaeology

This course is designed to introduce the beginning student to the basic techniques, concepts, and theories of archaeology and its relation to the wider field of anthropology.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ANTH 210 - Sociocultural Anthropology

ANTH 210 - Sociocultural Anthropology

Sociocultural anthropology deals with the relationship of culture to society and the individual. This course is designed for the beginning student and introduces the basic concepts, theories and methods of this broad field. It also looks at the application of ethnological thought in considering modern human realities and problems and in understanding the relationship of cultural and expressive forms to identity.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Spring 2020
Notes: This class also counts as a Liberal Arts Core Social Science (SS).

ART 112 - 2D Design

ART 112 - 2D Design

This course introduces two-dimensional design elements and principles, color theory and practice. Students will investigate diverse materials and techniques for effective visual communication. Critical thinking and conceptual problems are explored.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring
Notes: There is a course specific fee for this course.

BA 110 - Introduction to Business Decision Making

BA 110 - Introduction to Business Decision Making

An introduction to the professional expectations, responsibilities and global opportunities in business. The course will introduce the disciplines (Economics, Accounting and Finance, Management, Marketing, Data Analysis, and Ethics) which are involved in business decision making as well as the techniques used in such decision making.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

BA 205 - New Business Venturing

BA 205 - New Business Venturing

This course introduces students to starting and operating a business. At the macro level, students are exposed to how business interacts with government, financial institutions and society. At the micro level, students are exposed to customer psychology, basic economics, data analysis and interpretation. Individual research and writing a business plan are required. Other topics covered include franchising, home-based businesses and e-commerce.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ED 222 - Education: Global Perspectives

ED 222 - Education: Global Perspectives

Students in this course will study the social, philosophical, cultural, and intellectual foundations of “schooling” and “education” as they have evolved over time. Students will engage in research, discussions, and classroom activities that are directly related to American and international education. Students will write and critically think about topics related to education practice in this culturally diverse world.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ENGL 206 - Introduction to Media Production

ENGL 206 - Intro to Media Production

This course will introduce students to the production process, including video, audio, and new media elements. Students will use production equipment to learn scripting, visualization, producing, and editing through hands-on experience.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring
Notes: There is a course specific fee for this course.

ENGL 264 - Introduction to Creative Writing

ENGL 264 - Intro to Creative Writing

This creative writing course will introduce various genres of writing, such as poetry, fiction or creative non-fiction.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ENGL 270 - History of the Film

ENGL 270 - History of the Film

An overview of the history of international and Hollywood narrative films.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ENVS 100 - Introduction to Environmental Studies

ENVS 100 - Intro to Environmental Studies

Introduces students to interdisciplinary thinking and problem-solving in service to ecological sustainability and human well-being. By focusing on the interrelationships among science, technology, society and the arts, students explore a broad perspective of what it means for humans to affect, and be affected by, natural and built environments.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ESCI 100 - Introduction to Environmental Science

ESCI 100 - Intro to Environmental Science

Introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of Environmental Science. Students learn the process of science along with multiple cultural perspectives on the environment. They learn methodologies for water, land, and atmospheric sampling across diverse science disciplines. They explore concepts in conservation, restoration, resilience and hazard mitigation and will explore solutions to environmental issues of concern to them.

Credits: 4

ES 136 - Sports Officiating

ES 136 - Sports Officiating

This course is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of the rules, mechanics and training that sports officials undergo. Students taking this course will demonstrate how to interact with officials, and will be introduced to how an official should interact with coaches and spectators. Upon completion of the course, students will be properly trained to begin officiating sports, including but not limited to baseball, softball, soccer, football and track and field.

Credits: 2

ES 150 - Sociology of Sport

ES 150 - Sociology of Sport

An introductory study of the historical, cultural, sociological and philosophical aspects of exercise, sport and human movement.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ES 165 - Community First Aid & Safety

ES 165 - Community First Aid & Safety

Study and practice of first aid/CPR procedures in handling common injuries, accidents and medical emergencies.

Credits: 2
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring
Notes: There is a course specific fee for this course.

ES 185 - Introduction to Coaching: ASEP

ES 185 - Intro to Coaching: ASEP

This introductory course is the American Sport Education Program’s “Coaching Principles Course.” It covers the areas of coaching philosophy, sport psychology, sport pedagogy, sport physiology, sport management and sport-specific planning. The course covers what is important for a coach to know and presents the material in a manner that is of practical value to a coach. A series of videotapes helps create an atmosphere of discussion that gives students practical ways of handling coach/player relationships and situations. The student who passes the ASEP exam will receive certification which is rapidly becoming the required coaching certification.

Credits: 2
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ES 201 - Techniques of Strength and Conditioning Development

ES 201 - Techniques of Strength and Conditioning Development

This class with enable the learner to coach a high school or collegiate strength and conditioning program. Lectures will cover the essential knowledge of program design along with the managerial skills needed to coach athletes of all levels. The guided practice section will allow students to apply and demonstrate the learned material.

Credits: 2

ES 207 - Techniques of Coaching Endurance Athletes

ES 207 - Techniques of Coaching Endurance Athletes

This class will be focused on introducing the basic principles of endurance training. The essential knowledge of endurance coaching theory and practice will be presented. Guided practice sessions will allow the students to apply and demonstrate the material presented in class.

Credits: 2

ES 226 - Techniques of Coaching Volleyball

ES 226 - Techniques of Coaching Volleyball

The study of history, strategies, rules, methods and organization involved in coaching volleyball. Both theoretical and practical applications will be developed.

Credits: 2
Term Offered: Every Fall

ES 227 - Techniques of Coaching Basketball

ES 227 - Techniques of Coaching Basketball

The analysis of the game of basketball in theory and application with special emphasis upon teaching and coaching the game. Development of offense, defense and special situations for both prospective coaches and enthusiasts.

Credits: 2
Term Offered: Every Fall

HIST 241 - Public History: Scope and Methods

HIST 241 - Public History: Scope and Methods

Course focuses on Public History concepts and their connections within History and to other disciplines by examining how Public Historians take stories of the past outside the academy and present them to the general public (in the U.S. and the world). Students will analyze concepts and ideas central to Public History through archives, museums, historical sites, businesses, and mass media.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall

HON 223 - Multidisciplinary Perspectives (Honors)

HON 223 - Multidisciplinary Perspectives: White Like Me

Critical Whiteness Studies is a contemporary, inter- disciplinary, problem-oriented field. The problem it addresses is historic and very complex. Racism in America is endemic, ubiquitous and woven into the fabric of our lives and institutions. White Studies focuses on the evolution of a "radical white identity," a process through which white people may learn about their consistent, dominant role in American culture--social, political and economic--and the ways in which they may help to foster genuine equality and equity for all people. W.E.B. Dubois prophesied that the color line would serve as the great struggle of the twentieth century: nearly two decades into the twenty-first we still struggle with the burdens of racism and intolerance. This course is designed to explore the origins of racism in America, the factors that perpetuate it in our time, and the ways in which a real understanding of whiteness may serve to foster positive change.

Credits: 2

Term Offered: Fall 2018

MU 139 - Scenes from the Musical Stage

MU 139 - Scenes from the Musical Stage

Study and performance of the opera, operetta, and musical theater repertoire through fully staged ensemble scenes.

Credits: 1
Repeatable: This course is repeatable for a maximum of 4 credits.
Term Offered: Every Fall

PE - Any Physical Education class up to PE 1700

Options for Fall 2018:

  • PE 1216 - Social Dance
  • PE 1330 - Fitness - Running
  • PE 1380 - Fitness - Weight Training
  • PE 1390 - Fitness - Yoga
  • PE 1410 - Backpacking & Camping
  • PE 1422 - Desert Mountain Biking
  • PE 1430 - Day - Hiking
  • PE 1450 - Kayaking - Beginning
  • PE 1571 - Recreational Games
  • PE 1622 - Ultimate Frisbee/Team Handball
  • PE 1630 - Volleyball - Beginning

Credit: 1

PHIL 270 - Ancient Greek Philosophy

PHIL 270 - Ancient Greek Philsophy

This course is the first in a three course sequence in the history of philosophy. It covers the period from the origin of philosophy with the pre-Socratic thinkers in the 6th century BCE to the philosophers of the Roman Empire, focusing primarily on Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, and the Stoics of the Hellenistic and Roman periods.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Fall 2018
Notes: Completion of COMP 150 or placement in COMP 250 preferred.

PHIL 271 - Logic

PHIL 271 - Logic

An introduction to the methods for assessing the quality of arguments paying special attention both to (a) the identification of arguments in English prose and (b) the evaluation of an argument’s validity or strength. Issues covered include informal fallacies of reasoning; introductory probability theory; categorical reasoning; Venn diagrams; and translations, truth-tables and natural deduction in propositional logic.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Spring 2018, Spring 2020
Notes: Completion of COMP 150 or placement in COMP 250 preferred.

PHIL 272 - God, Faith, and Reason

PHIL 272 - God, Faith, and Reason

This course explores philosophical problems raised by religion: Is there a supernatural reality? If so, how do we know about it? Is it reasonable to have religious faith? Does God exist? If God knows the future, can humans act freely? Does the existence of evil disprove the existence of God? Can all religions be equally true?

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Fall 2018, Spring 2019
Notes: Completion of COMP 150 or placement in COMP 250 preferred.

PS 232 - Global Environmental Politics

PS 232 - Global Environmental Politics

This course will apply International Relations' theories to the study of global environmental issues. It introduces key environmental issues, and analyzes the causes and risks of global environmental change and responses to it. It also emphasizes the historical development of international environmental politics and agreements, examines phases in the development of environmental regimes, and critiques these regimes.

Credits: 3

Term Offered: Every Fall

SOC 200 - Social Change

SOC 200 - Social Change

This course is designed to facilitate critical understanding of, and commitment to, processes of social change in modern society. Using historical and theoretical analysis of social change efforts, students are encouraged to embrace and develop models of change that take seriously the personal and social dimensions of human struggle.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

SOC 230 - Resiliency and Society

SOC 230 - Resiliency and Society

Resiliency is the ability of a system to rebound after shock or disruption. This course will explore strategies to encourage resiliency in individuals and families dealing with social problems, communities facing environmental or economic shock, and ecological systems facing issues such as drought, climate change, and invasive species.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

SPAN 101 - Elementary Spanish I

SPAN 101 - Elementary Spanish I

A course in grammar, prose composition, reading, and conversation. Beginning Spanish is for students with no previous exposure to the Spanish language. Development of all four language skills, especially listening and speaking.

Credits: 4
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

THEA 100 - Theatrical Production

THEA 100 - Theatrical Production

This course offers students interested in theatrical production the opportunity to apply foundational skills in the areas of technical theatre, performance, management and marketing. Students gain a working knowledge of skills necessary to stage a performance.

Credits: 1-3
Hours: 50 hours are the equivalent of one credit hour.
Repeatable: This course is repeatable for a maximum of 12 credits.
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring
Notes: There is a course specific fee for this course.

THEA 138 - Acting Techniques I

THEA 138 - Acting Techniques I

This course introduces students to basic performance techniques including bodywork, voice, characterization, audition techniques, and beginning text analysis through scene and monologue work.

Credits: 4
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

Upper division/upperclassmen coursework

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ACC 225 - Introduction to Financial Accounting

ACC 225 - Introduction to Financial Accounting

The first of a two-course sequence in basic accounting, this course emphasizes the preparation, understanding and analysis of the standard financial statements for the purpose of making informed business decisions. Topics covered also include the processing of transactions through the accounting cycle, generally accepted accounting principles, and the role of accounting in business.

Credits: 3
Class Level Restriction: Sophomore
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring, Every Summer

ART 351 - Ceramics

ART 351 - Ceramics

This course will introduce and develop the technical skills and knowledge of ceramic materials and processes including hand building, wheel throwing, surfacing, and firing.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring
Notes: There is a course specific fee for this course.

ART 370 - Art History Topics: Picturing Nature

ART 370 - Art History Topics: Picturing Nature

This class explores intersections between visual culture and environmental history in the U.S. from the 19th century to the present. We will address various ways visuals have influenced our interactions with nature and understanding of concepts like "wilderness." We will also consider some of the ways nature has shaped the production of artwork and other visuals and aethetic interests.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Undergraduate level ART 262 Minimum Grade of C- or Undergraduate level ART 263 Minimum Grade of C-
 

BA 306 - Business Creativity & Innovation

BA 306 - Business Creativity & Innovation

This course examines the chronological and conceptual history of visual communication. Students investigate relationships between design, political and cultural conditions, and technological developments. Outcomes include an understanding of the history of visual communication in contemporary life and awareness about the future of the field.

Credits: 3
Class Level Restriction: Sophomore
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

BA 320 - Leadership Theory and Practice

This course examines a wide range of leadership theories and practices in today’s organizational settings. The course addresses the strengths and criticisms, and practical aspects of various leadership approaches.

Credits: 3
Class Level Restriction: Junior
Term Offered: Every Fall

BA 330 - Tourism/Hospitality Management

BA 330 - Tourism/Hospitality Management

An introductory course covering the scope, organization, and environment of the domestic and international tourism and hospitality industry. Topics to be covered include industry components, supply and demand, motivation and sociology, economics, public policy and environmental issues, and current leadership and management challenges facing the industry.

Credits: 3
Class Level Restriction: Junior
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

BA 334 - Sustainable Tourism

BA 334 - Sustainable Tourism

This course provides a theoretical and practical understanding of sustainable tourism in developed and developing countries. The sustainable tourism movement is explored holistically in its application to the economic, environmental, and socio-cultural impacts of tourism. Case studies and projects with real world application consider how more appropriate forms of tourism can minimize negative impacts of tourism for future generations.

Credits: 3
Clock Hours - (Lect-Lab): (3-0)
Class Level Restriction: Junior
Term Offered: Every Fall

BA 362 - Cross-Cultural Management

BA 362 - Cross-Cultural Management

This cross-cultural management course allows students to gain perspectives and real world applications in global business using knowledge from multiple disciplines and diverse cultural topics. Students examine the opportunities and challenges in different regions in an ever-changing global business world.

Credits: 3
Class Level Restriction: Junior
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring, Every Summer

BA 385 - Risky Decisions

BA 385 - Risky Decisions

This course examines the relationship between decisions and risk in the business enterprise. Spreadsheet models using decision trees, Monte Carlo Simulation, and other various modeling techniques form the basis for examining these relationships. Probability concepts and Palisade Decision Tools software such as Precision Tree and @Risk are used as primary analysis tools in Excel to model the decision-risk relationship. 

Credits: 3
Class Level Restriction: Junior
Term Offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2019

ENGL 250 - Practicum: Indy/Indy Online

ENGL 250 - Practicum: Indy/Indy Online

Directed experience for lower- and upper-division students in news work on the FLC Independent and Indy Online.

Credits: 1-6
Hours: 50 hours are the equivalent of one credit hour.
Permissions Required: Instructor
Repeatable: This course is repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits.
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring
Notes: There is a course specific fee for this course.

ENGL 251 - Practicum: KDUR/Audio

ENGL 251 - Practicum: KDUR/Audio

Directed experience for lower- and upper-division students in audio production and radio broadcasting in affiliation with KDUR, the college-community radio station.

Credits: 1-6
Hours: 50 hours are the equivalent of one credit hour.
Permissions Required: Instructor
Repeatable: This course is repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits.
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring
Notes: There is a course specific fee for this course.

ENGL 344 - British Literature Topics: Arthurian Legend

An in-depth study of selected British writings after 1800. Course content will focus on the legends and literature surrounding King Arthur.

Credits: 3
Clock Hours - (Lect-Lab): (3-0)
Repeatable: This course is repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits provided the topics are different.
Term Offered: Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Spring 2020

ENGL 346 - American Literature Topics: American Modernism

ENGL 346 - American Literature Topics: American Modernism

An in-depth study of selected American writings from 1900 to the present. Course content will focus on American Modernism.

Credits: 3
Clock Hours - (Lect-Lab): (3-0)
Repeatable: This course is reapeatable for a maximum of 6 credits provided the topics are different.
Term Offered: Every Fall

ES 300 - Sport in Film

ES 300 - Sport in Film

This course will take a conceptual and sociological look at sport through its films both contemporary and classic. Viewings, discussions, debates, critical reviews and writings will be used to explore the themes, issues and methods used in selected films and the interrelationships of sport, human movement, society and film.

Credits: 2
Class Level Restriction: Sophomore
Term Offered: Fall 2018

ES 303 - Gender and Sport

ES 303 - Gender and Sport

This course examines the intersection of culturally based gender systems with the system of sport on various competitive levels. History of sport and Title IX, relative to women’s emergence into athletics, and the commonallities and differences of men’s and women’s experiences in sport will be explored. Course content and its connections will be gained through reading, discussion, research, and shared experience.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: FLC Writing Placement Score C250 OR successful completion of COMP 150
Class Level Restriction: Junior
Term Offered: Fall 2018

HIST 302 - Ancient Rome

HIST 302 - Ancient Rome

Course exposes students to higher-level, specialized concepts about history of Ancient Rome, building on prior coursework. Course covers Rome from Etruscan beginnings to end of the Empire. Topics include: republican government, imperial expansion, education, the arts, the Latin language, as well as the “lighter” side of Rome, including bread and circuses, funeral clowns, baths and brothels.

Credits: 3
Clock Hours - (Lect-Lab): (3-0)
Prerequisites: (COMP 150 OR one CO2 course OR FLC Writing Placement Score 250) AND one HI1 course Details: CO2 course list: COMP 250, COMP 252, COMP 253, ENGL 268, SOC 210 Details: HI1 course list: HIST 150, HIST 151, HIST 160, HIST 181, HIST 261, HIST 270, HIST 271, HIST 280, HIST 281, NAIS 123
Term Offered: Fall 2018, Spring 2019

HIST 313 - Wilderness in America

HIST 313 - Wilderness in America

Course focuses on specialized historic concepts while tracing the history of wilderness on American public lands, beginning in the 1600s to the establishment of the federal wilderness preservation system in 1964. Students read history, literature and science and come to understand difficult and sometimes unfamiliar issues in managing wilderness areas today.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: (COMP 150 OR one CO2 course OR FLC Writing Placement Score 250) AND one HI1 course Details: CO2 course list: COMP 250, COMP 252, COMP 253, ENGL 268, SOC 210 Details: HI1 course list: HIST 150, HIST 151, HIST 160, HIST 181, HIST 261, HIST 270, HIST 271, HIST 280, HIST 281, NAIS 123
Term Offered: Every Fall

HIST 324 - Colorado History

HIST 324 - Colorado History

Course traces the history of Colorado and its people from the Anasazi to the present day, exposing students to specialized concepts and techniques central to the understanding of regional history and historiography. Students apply knowledge and skills previously learned to unfamiliar topics and issues unique to Coloradan history, such as architecture, culture, politics, geography, demography, and even patterns of movement.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: (COMP 150 OR one CO2 course OR FLC Writing Placement Score 250) AND one HI1 course Details: CO2 course list: COMP 250, COMP 252, COMP 253, ENGL 268, SOC 210 Details: HI1 course list: HIST 150, HIST 151, HIST 160, HIST 181, HIST 261, HIST 270, HIST 271, HIST 280, HIST 281, NAIS 123
Term Offered: Fall 2018, Spring 2020

HIST 334 - U.S. War in Vietnam

HIST 334 - U.S. War in Vietnam

No conflict so dramatizes the contradictions of the Cold War or so exposes the dynamics of United States’ imperialism than the U.S. intervention in Southeast Asia. The course analyzes the history of U.S. foreign interventions, the Vietnamese struggle for self-determination, and the U.S. turmoil that resulted from this war.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: (COMP 150 OR one CO2 course OR FLC Writing Placement Score 250) AND one HI1 course Details: CO2 course list: COMP 250, COMP 252, COMP 253, ENGL 268, SOC 210 Details: HI1 course list: HIST 150, HIST 151, HIST 160, HIST 181, HIST 261, HIST 270, HIST 271, HIST 280, HIST 281, NAIS 123
Term Offered: Fall 2018

HIST 371 - History of Central America

HIST 371 - History of Central America

Course examines important trends in Central America since late 15th century. Course focuses on aspects of colonial society that have remained vital into the present, aftermath of political independence from Spain, prominent roles of British and North American interests, unique economic developments and the late 20th century revolutionary turmoil.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: (COMP 150 OR one CO2 course OR FLC Writing Placement Score 250) AND one HI1 course Details: CO2 course list: COMP 250, COMP 252, COMP 253, ENGL 268, SOC 210 Details: HI1 course list: HIST 150, HIST 151, HIST 160, HIST 181, HIST 261, HIST 270, HIST 271, HIST 280, HIST 281, NAIS 123
Term Offered: Fall 2018, Every Spring

HIST 378 - Two World Wars in Europe

HIST 378 - Two World Wars in Europe

This course examines the causes, progress, and consequences of both European wars of the twentieth century. The First World War was a decisive event in modern world history and the first conflict to feature the mobilization of whole industrial societies. The Great War and its aftermath brought about the Great Depression, Nazism, Communism, the Second World War, and the Holocaust.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: (COMP 150 OR one CO2 course OR FLC Writing Placement Score 250) AND one HI1 course Details: CO2 course list: COMP 250, COMP 252, COMP 253, ENGL 268, SOC 210 Details: HI1 course list: HIST 150, HIST 151, HIST 160, HIST 181, HIST 261, HIST 270, HIST 271, HIST 280, HIST 281, NAIS 123
Term Offered: Fall 2018

HON 423 - Multidisciplinary Perspectives (Honors)

HON 423 - Multidisciplinary Perspectives: White Like Me

Critical Whiteness Studies is a contemporary, inter- disciplinary, problem-oriented field. The problem it addresses is historic and very complex. Racism in America is endemic, ubiquitous and woven into the fabric of our lives and institutions. White Studies focuses on the evolution of a "radical white identity," a process through which white people may learn about their consistent, dominant role in American culture--social, political and economic--and the ways in which they may help to foster genuine equality and equity for all people. W.E.B. Dubois prophesied that the color line would serve as the great struggle of the twentieth century: nearly two decades into the twenty-first we still struggle with the burdens of racism and intolerance. This course is designed to explore the origins of racism in America, the factors that perpetuate it in our time, and the ways in which a real understanding of whiteness may serve to foster positive change.

Credits: 2

Term Offered: Fall 2018

Restrictions: Must be at least Junior standing. (If you are a Freshman or Sophomore, there is a 200 level version of this class, HON 223)

MU 331 - Music History I

MU 331 - Music History I

Study of the history of music from classical antiquity to 1750.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Fall 2018

MU 339 - Scenes from the Musical Stage

MU 339 - Scenes from the Musical Stage

Study and performance of the opera, operetta, and musical theater repertoire through fully staged ensemble scenes.

Credits: 1
Repeatable: This course is repeatable for a maximum of 12 credits.
Term Offered: Every Fall

NAIS 311 - Indigenous Women

NAIS 311 - Indigenous Women

Focusing on the intersectionality of Indigenous women’s lives, this course examines the social, cultural, and political status of Indigenous women. This course also examines the critical contributions of Indigenous feminism to the dominant discourse on feminism.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: One CO2 course Details: CO2 course list: COMP 250, COMP 252 COMP 253, ENGL 268, SOC 210
Term Offered: Fall 2018, Spring 2020

PHIL 365 - Feminist Philosophies

PHIL 365 - Feminist Philosophies

This course examines a variety of philosophical frameworks for thinking about gender, sexuality, women’s movements, the problems of sexism, and proposed solutions to those problems. Students explore the complexity and diversity of feminist thought by examining many different philosophies of feminism including liberal, radical, cultural, Marxist/socialist, existentialist, postmodern, ecological, and indigenous perspectives.  

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None. It is recommended that you have finished a CO2 (Composition) class. 
Term Offered: Fall 2018, Spring 2019

PS 300 - Religion and Politics

PS 300 - Religion and Politics

Religion is one important vehicle for mobilizing people to engage politically with government and other citizens. The focus of this course is on the role religion plays as a justification for political participation, public policy advocacy, and even violence in the U.S. and around the world.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Spring 2020

PS 325 - Middle East Politics

PS 325 - Middle East Politics

Religion is one important vehicle for mobilizing people to engage politically with government and other citizens. The focus of this course is on the role religion plays as a justification for political participation, public policy advocacy, and even violence in the U.S. and around the world.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Spring 2020

PS 390 - Political Psychology

PS 390 - Political Psychology

An examination of the psychological roots of current political debates and problems, from political knowledge to participation, group conflict, attitude formation, polarization, extremism, and the interplay of cognition and emotion. In particular, the disjuncture between the requirements of democratic theory and evolved human psychology is today's rapidly changing information environment will be a recurring theme.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Fall 2018

SOC 361 - Deviance

SOC 361 - Deviance

An examination of the traditional versions of deviance followed by modern critiques that emphasize “labeling” and the more phenomenological approaches to understanding human conduct.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall
 

SOC 363 - Youth and Crime

SOC 363 - Youth and Crime

This course examines youth in relation to the U.S. juvenile justice system, with attention to policies that push specific youth out of school and into the streets to be targets for incarceration. The school to prison pipeline, stigmatization and criminalization of youth, and youth justice and empowerment programs and policies will be central themes of this course.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall

SOC 364 - Criminology: Punishment & Domination

SOC 364 - Criminology: Punishment & Domination

This course will provide a historical overview of punitive justice and the U.S. criminal justice system from a critical criminology perspective. Students will be introduced to perspectives on crime grounded in Marxism, feminism, anarchism, green criminology, critical race theory, disability studies, queer studies, de-colonialism, social justice, youth justice, and critical theory.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall

SOC 376 - Language and Social Behavior

SOC 376 - Language and Social Behavior

A concentrated look at the social function of language use in society. The extent to which languages create social reality will receive scrutiny. Particular topics may include language and social class, language and sex, linguistic politics, language and culture, or language cognition and development.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2019

SOC 377 - Animals and Society

SOC 377 - Animals and Society

Non-human animals figure in our language, food, clothing, family structure, economy, education, entertainment, science, and recreation. This course will critically examine the complex role of non-human animals in human society and investigate our ambivalent and contradictory attitudes toward them. Included will be an exploration of animal cognition, emotion, and the moral status and rights of animals.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Fall 2018, Spring 2019

THEA 420 - Theatre for Social Action

THEA 420 - Theatre for Social Action

This course will provide students with the opportunity to examine issues of Social Justice and offer healing solutions to social, cultural, institutional, interpersonal and personal oppressions that occur in our community, country, and on a global level. Students will learn interactive theater techniques used by practitioners as tools to help bring about social change and healing.

Credits: 3
Class Level Restriction: Junior
Term Offered: Fall 2018