Free Elective Options for Fall 2019

Free electives are courses outside your major, minor, and Liberal Arts Core. These are classes that count towards your overall graduation total but do not have to lead to higher coursework and are not required for your degree path.

The first list is classes that do not have prerequisites or class standing requirements. These classes are for any students needing a free elective in the Fall 2019 semester. You can click on the class to see a summary, the number of credits you'll earn from the class, and any other notes or extra information.

The second list is classes that have prerequisites, class standing requirements, or a more advanced courseload. These classes are primarily for upperclassmen (juniors and seniors) unless you have fulfilled the requirements of the class you're interested in. You can click on the class to see a summary, the number of credits you'll earn from the class, the required prerequisites, and any other notes or extra information.

Not sure if a free elective is the right choice for you or will fit with your schedule? Schedule an appointment with your advisor or stop by Walk-In Advising to talk about your options.

Lower division coursework, no prerequisites

ANTH 151 - Introduction to Anthropology

ANTH 151 - Introduction to Anthropology

This course provides a comprehensive introductory study of general anthropology covering the four major subfields (biological, linguistic, archaeological and sociocultural). It also addresses the ways that knowledge gained in the four subfields may be applied to solving real-world problems.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring
Notes: This class also counts as a Liberal Arts Core Social Science (SS) course.

ANTH 171 - World Prehistory

ANTH 171 - World Prehistory

Students study the fundamental role that technology, as evidenced in the archaeological record, has played in the evolution of humans, from the earliest hominids to the rise of states in the Old and New Worlds. The interconnection between technology and society is emphasized, as is the scientific method and its historical and cultural contexts.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall

ANTH 201 - Introduction to Archaeology

ANTH 201 - Introduction to Archaeology

This course is designed to introduce the beginning student to the basic techniques, concepts, and theories of archaeology and its relation to the wider field of anthropology.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ANTH 210 - Sociocultural Anthropology

ANTH 210 - Sociocultural Anthropology

Sociocultural anthropology deals with the relationship of culture to society and the individual. This course is designed for the beginning student and introduces the basic concepts, theories and methods of this broad field. It also looks at the application of ethnological thought in considering modern human realities and problems and in understanding the relationship of cultural and expressive forms to identity.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Spring 2020
Notes: This class also counts as a Liberal Arts Core Social Science (SS).

ANTH 212 - Introduction to Applied Anthropology

ANTH 212 - Introduction to Applied Anthropology

Applied and practicing anthropologists directly serve the needs and interests of communities and organizations around the world. This course provides an introduction to the ways in which anthropology and anthropologists work toward finding solutions to real world problems. A case study approach provides the student with methods for seeing how social and environmental problems are defined, solutions generated, and outcomes evaluated. 
 
Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Spring, Fall 2019

ART 112 - 2D Design

ART 112 - 2D Design

This course introduces two-dimensional design elements and principles, color theory and practice. Students will investigate diverse materials and techniques for effective visual communication. Critical thinking and conceptual problems are explored.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring
Notes: There is a course specific fee for this course.

BL 101 - Beginning Spanish

BL 101 - Beginning Spanish

This course is designed for the beginner in Spanish.  Students have an opportunity to improve Spanish skills while developing an awareness and appreciation of music and borderlands. They will also begin to develop their ability to read and write in Spanish as well as analyze the complexity of borders through cultural representation in art, music, film, and literature.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring
Notes: No Spanish language skills required.

BL 102 - Survival Spanish Topics

BL 102 - Survival Spanish

A beginner course in Spanish for students or community members with little or no prior language study, designed to prepare them for embarking on study abroad.

Credits: 2
Term Offered: Every Fall
Notes: No Spanish language skills required.

BL 220 - The Immigrant Experience

BL 220 - The Immigrant Experience

The class analyzes the historical and political relationships of the U.S. and Latin American countries in order to understand Latinxs immigration.  The course explores themes such as nationalism, social class, education, gender, sexuality, borders and violence. The students also collaborate with the immigrant population of Durango and work to develop an archival collection. 
 
Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring
Notes: No Spanish language skills are required.

BA 110 - Introduction to Business Decision Making

BA 110 - Introduction to Business Decision Making

An introduction to the professional expectations, responsibilities and global opportunities in business. The course will introduce the disciplines (Economics, Accounting and Finance, Management, Marketing, Data Analysis, and Ethics) which are involved in business decision making as well as the techniques used in such decision making.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

BA 131 - Introduction to Resort Management

BA 131 - Introduction to Resort Management

An introductory course covering the scope, organization, and environment of resort operations. The course focuses on an analysis of the physical, financial and human variables involved in the operation of a destination resort. 
 
Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Spring, Fall 2019

ED 222 - Education: Global Perspectives

ED 222 - Education: Global Perspectives

Students in this course will study the social, philosophical, cultural, and intellectual foundations of “schooling” and “education” as they have evolved over time. Students will engage in research, discussions, and classroom activities that are directly related to American and international education. Students will write and critically think about topics related to education practice in this culturally diverse world.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ENGL 174 - African-American Literature

ENGL 174 - African-American Literature

A study of selected 19th and 20th century works by African-American writers.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Fall 2022

ENGL 206 - Introduction to Media Production

ENGL 206 - Intro to Media Production

This course will introduce students to the production process, including video, audio, and new media elements. Students will use production equipment to learn scripting, visualization, producing, and editing through hands-on experience.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring
Notes: There is a course specific fee for this course.

ENGL 215 - Journalism I

ENGL 215 - Journalism I

This course teaches students how to write news stories in print/online/social media. The course will also cover news commentary and blogs. The assignments for this course will clarify the relationship between news and public relations. This course prepares students for work in later media courses and in practica and for their professional aspirations.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall

ENGL 264 - Introduction to Creative Writing

ENGL 264 - Intro to Creative Writing

This creative writing course will introduce various genres of writing, such as poetry, fiction or creative non-fiction.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ENGL 267 - Persuasive Writing

ENGL 267 - Persuasive Writing

An introduction to the basic principles of writing persuasively, with an emphasis on invention, organization, style, and presentation.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall

ENGL 270 - History of the Film

ENGL 270 - History of the Film

An overview of the history of international and Hollywood narrative films.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ENT 205 - New Business Venturing

ENT 205 - New Business Venturing

This course introduces students to starting and operating a business. At the macro level, students are exposed to how business interacts with government, financial institutions and society. At the micro level, students are exposed to customer psychology, basic economics, data analysis and interpretation. Individual research and writing a business plan are required. Other topics covered include franchising, home-based businesses and e-commerce.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ESCI 100 - Introduction to Environmental Science

ESCI 100 - Intro to Environmental Science

Introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of Environmental Science. Students learn the process of science along with multiple cultural perspectives on the environment. They learn methodologies for water, land, and atmospheric sampling across diverse science disciplines. They explore concepts in conservation, restoration, resilience and hazard mitigation and will explore solutions to environmental issues of concern to them.

Credits: 4

ENVS 100 - Introduction to Environmental Studies

ENVS 100 - Intro to Environmental Studies

Introduces students to interdisciplinary thinking and problem-solving in service to ecological sustainability and human well-being. By focusing on the interrelationships among science, technology, society and the arts, students explore a broad perspective of what it means for humans to affect, and be affected by, natural and built environments.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ES 101 - Basic Prevention & Treatment of Athletic Injuries

ES 101 - Basic Prevention & Treatment of Athletic Injuries

This is an introductory course into the field of coaching. Emphasis is placed on recognition of the etiology, mechanism of injury, signs and symptoms, and management of common athletic injuries of the lower extremity. Knowledge in these areas will provide the coach with the tools to prevent, better recognize, and properly manage athletic injuries.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ES 136 - Sports Officiating

ES 136 - Sports Officiating

This course is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of the rules, mechanics and training that sports officials undergo. Students taking this course will demonstrate how to interact with officials, and will be introduced to how an official should interact with coaches and spectators. Upon completion of the course, students will be properly trained to begin officiating sports, including but not limited to baseball, softball, soccer, football and track and field.

Credits: 2

ES 165 - Community First Aid & Safety

ES 165 - Community First Aid & Safety

Study and practice of first aid/CPR procedures in handling common injuries, accidents and medical emergencies.

Credits: 2
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring
Notes: There is a course specific fee for this course.

ES 185 - Introduction to Coaching: ASEP

ES 185 - Intro to Coaching: ASEP

This introductory course is the American Sport Education Program’s “Coaching Principles Course.” It covers the areas of coaching philosophy, sport psychology, sport pedagogy, sport physiology, sport management and sport-specific planning. The course covers what is important for a coach to know and presents the material in a manner that is of practical value to a coach. A series of videotapes helps create an atmosphere of discussion that gives students practical ways of handling coach/player relationships and situations. The student who passes the ASEP exam will receive certification which is rapidly becoming the required coaching certification.

Credits: 2
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ES 201 - Techniques of Strength and Conditioning Development

ES 201 - Techniques of Strength and Conditioning Development

This class with enable the learner to coach a high school or collegiate strength and conditioning program. Lectures will cover the essential knowledge of program design along with the managerial skills needed to coach athletes of all levels. The guided practice section will allow students to apply and demonstrate the learned material.

Credits: 2

ES 202 - Introduction to Sport Administration

ES 202 - Introduction to Sport Administration

This course will introduce students to the field of sport administration and provide an overview of the field from the historical, economic, ethical, psychological and legal perspectives. The course will also emphasize current issues and trends in the sport industry.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall

ES 207 - Techniques of Coaching Endurance Athletes

ES 207 - Techniques of Coaching Endurance Athletes

This class will be focused on introducing the basic principles of endurance training. The essential knowledge of endurance coaching theory and practice will be presented. Guided practice sessions will allow the students to apply and demonstrate the material presented in class.

Credits: 2

ES 226 - Techniques of Coaching Volleyball

ES 226 - Techniques of Coaching Volleyball

The study of history, strategies, rules, methods and organization involved in coaching volleyball. Both theoretical and practical applications will be developed.

Credits: 2
Term Offered: Every Fall

ES 227 - Techniques of Coaching Basketball

ES 227 - Techniques of Coaching Basketball

The analysis of the game of basketball in theory and application with special emphasis upon teaching and coaching the game. Development of offense, defense and special situations for both prospective coaches and enthusiasts.

Credits: 2
Term Offered: Every Fall

MU 105 - Concert Choir

MU 105 - Concert Choir

Thorough study and performance each semester of larger choral compositions.

Credits: 1
Repeatable: This course is repeatable for a maximum of 12 credits.
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

MU 110 - Band

MU 110 - Band

Designed to provide every student who plays a musical instrument the opportunity to pursue his or her musical interests. A variety of musical literature will be provided as well as the opportunity to perform in concert both on campus and on tour.

Credits: 1
Repeatable: This course is repeatable for a maximum of 12 credits.
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

MU 117 - Symphony Orchestra

MU 117 - Symphony Orchestra

Offered in conjunction with the San Juan Symphony Orchestra at no extra fee. This course provides an opportunity for the study and performance of major orchestral works. Two hours of rehearsal are held on Tuesday evenings and the third is arranged at the convenience of the instructor and students.

Credits: 1
Permissions Required: Instructor
Repeatable: This course is repeatable for a maximum of 12 credits.
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring
Notes: Open to all string students; wind and percussion students by audition only.

 

MU 139 - Scenes from the Musical Stage

MU 139 - Scenes from the Musical Stage

Study and performance of the opera, operetta, and musical theater repertoire through fully staged ensemble scenes.

Credits: 1
Repeatable: This course is repeatable for a maximum of 4 credits.
Term Offered: Every Fall

PHIL 144 - Chinese Philosophy

PHIL 140 - Chinese Philosophy

This course investigates the origins of Chinese philosophy in the classical period and follows the development of the major traditions through later centuries. Emphasis is on Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism. We explore and evaluate the theories of human nature, knowledge, and reality embraced by these philosophies, as well as their conceptions of ethics and political philosophy.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Fall 2019
Notes: Completion of COMP 150 or placement in COMP 250 preferred.

PHIL 271 - Logic

PHIL 271 - Logic

An introduction to the methods for assessing the quality of arguments paying special attention both to (a) the identification of arguments in English prose and (b) the evaluation of an argument’s validity or strength. Issues covered include informal fallacies of reasoning; introductory probability theory; categorical reasoning; Venn diagrams; and translations, truth-tables and natural deduction in propositional logic.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Spring 2018, Spring 2020
Notes: Completion of COMP 150 or placement in COMP 250 preferred.

PE - Any Physical Education class up to PE 1700

Options for Fall 2019:

  • PE 1216 - Social Dance
  • PE 1330 - Fitness - Running
  • PE 1380 - Fitness - Weight Training
  • PE 1390 - Fitness - Yoga
  • PE 1410 - Backpacking & Camping
  • PE 1422 - Desert Mountain Biking
  • PE 1430 - Day - Hiking
  • PE 1450 - Kayaking - Beginning
  • PE 1571 - Recreational Games
  • PE 1622 - Ultimate Frisbee/Team Handball
  • PE 1630 - Volleyball - Beginning

Credit: 1

PS 130 - Introduction to Environmental Policy

PS 130 - Introduction to Environmental Policy

This introductory course examines the political and policy dimensions of environmental protection. Topics include ecology and normative assumptions; rationales for government intervention; political actors and institutions; policy analysis and change. The primary focus is domestic; coverage is expanded to assess global environmental issues, particularly in terms of cultural considerations; scientific determinants; and controversies related to risk assessment and scientific uncertainty.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

PS 232 - Global Environmental Politics

PS 232 - Global Environmental Politics

This course will apply International Relations' theories to the study of global environmental issues. It introduces key environmental issues, and analyzes the causes and risks of global environmental change and responses to it. It also emphasizes the historical development of international environmental politics and agreements, examines phases in the development of environmental regimes, and critiques these regimes.

Credits: 3

Term Offered: Every Fall

SOC 250 - Social Issues: Native Society

SOC 250 - Social Issues: Native Society

An examination of the social, political, and economic circumstances of both urban and rural native societies worldwide. Emphasis will be on the United States. Topics may include indigenous peoples in cities, tribal councils, environmental racism, criminal justice, social services, youth, international indigenous issues and networks.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Fall 2019

THEA 100 - Theatrical Production

THEA 100 - Theatrical Production

This course offers students interested in theatrical production the opportunity to apply foundational skills in the areas of technical theatre, performance, management and marketing. Students gain a working knowledge of skills necessary to stage a performance.

Credits: 1-3
Hours: 50 hours are the equivalent of one credit hour.
Repeatable: This course is repeatable for a maximum of 12 credits.
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring
Notes: There is a course specific fee for this course.

THEA 130 - Stage Technology

THEA 130 - Stage Technology

This course provides students with the foundational skills in technical theatre including scenery construction, costume construction, prop construction, and stage lighting.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

THEA 138 - Acting Techniques I

THEA 138 - Acting Techniques I

This course introduces students to basic performance techniques including bodywork, voice, characterization, audition techniques, and beginning text analysis through scene and monologue work.

Credits: 4
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

THEA 160 - Dance Techniques: Jazz Dance

THEA 160 - Dance Techniques: Jazz Techniques

This course introduces students to basic jazz dance techniques. Students gain foundational skills for body awareness, health and performance.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Fall 2019, Fall 2020, Spring 2021

THEA 257 - Make-up Techniques

THEA 257 - Make-up Techniques

This course is the study and application of the production elements, materials, methods, and principles of design as applied to stage make-up. Presented in a studio format and project driven, the class explores script analysis, concept development, style selection, and extensive practice in a variety of techniques for make-up.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Fall 2019, Fall 2021
Upper division/upperclassmen coursework

ACC 225 - Introduction to Financial Accounting

ACC 225 - Introduction to Financial Accounting

The first of a two-course sequence in basic accounting, this course emphasizes the preparation, understanding and analysis of the standard financial statements for the purpose of making informed business decisions. Topics covered also include the processing of transactions through the accounting cycle, generally accepted accounting principles, and the role of accounting in business.

Credits: 3
Class Level Restriction: Sophomore
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring, Every Summer

ANTH 330 - Prehistory of the Southwest

ANTH 330 - Prehistory of the Southwest

This course provides a comprehensive survey of the major cultural traditions of the prehistoric Southwestern United States, including the environmental and social factors that contributed to their distinctiveness.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: One CO2 course Details: CO2 course list: COMP 250, COMP 252, COMP 253, ENGL 268, SOC 210
Term Offered: Fall 2019, Fall 2021

ANTH 333 - Global Tourism

ANTH 333 - Global Tourism

This course examines the culture of and impacts stemming from the global tourism phenomenon. Tourism is a dynamic force of development and cultural exchange, though at times with profound adverse consequences. Topics include, but are not limited to, cultural and environmental impacts, medical tourism, ecotourism, humanitarianism, development, cultural revitalization, sex tourism, gender and tourism, the commodification of culture, and adventure tourism.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall

ANTH 347 - Archaeology Topics: Ice Age North America

ANTH 347 - Archaeology Topics: Ice Age North America

This course will introduce students to the archaeological, environmental and geological evidence related to the timing of human entry into the Americas and fauna extinctions at the end of the Pleistocene. Class meetings in this course consist of lectures, discussions, and structured debates.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: One CO2 course Details: CO2 course list: COMP 250, COMP 252, COMP 253, ENGL 268, SOC 210
Repeatable: This course is repeatable for a maximum of 9 credits provided the topics are different.
Term Offered: Every Fall

ANTH 357 - Medical Anthropology

ANTH 357 - Medical Anthropology 

The medical systems of indigenous peoples are analyzed cross-culturally from the perspectives of epidemiology, symbolism, history and political economy. Topics will include the development of medical anthropology, the medical traditions of Ayurvedic, humoral, shamanic and biomedical practitioners, theories of cause and cure, and applied practice. This course is recommended for pre-health and social science majors.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall

ART 315 - Gallery Management

ART 370 - Art History Topics: Art of Protest

ART 370 - Art History Topics: Art of Protest

Art of Protest:Activism and U.S. Visual Culture This course explores the role art and othere visuals have played in social protest and activist movements in the United States since the early twentieth century. Throughout the semester, we will look at some of the major processes at work in the formation and growth of activist movements, paying particular attention to the social and political contexts that have inspired activism and the aesthetic strategies individuals use to articulate their goals and mobilize the public. In the process, we will explore a variety of topics and themes, including identity politics, the civil rights movement, ecofeminism, culture jamming, and cyber-activism.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: Undergraduate level ART 262 Minimum Grade of C- or Undergraduate level ART 263 Minimum Grade of C-
 

BL 401 - Fronteras: Advanced Spanish

BL 401 - Fronteras: Advanced Spanish

This is a course for advanced Spanish speakers to gain more proficiency and fluency in the language.  Reading, writing, speaking, comprehending Spanish will be emphasized.  

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall
Notes: Spanish language skills required.

BL 434 - Trauma, Borders, and Monsters

BL 434 - Trauma, Borders, and Monsters

Students will explore the relation between immigration, fear and monsters analyzing social, political, economic, and multicultural aspects of immigration in United States and Europe, as well as film and literature in English and Spanish depicting monsters and dictatorships. Students will develop communication skills in English and Spanish to be familiar with media produced in the Spanish language.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Fall 2019, Fall 2021
Notes: Spanish language skills required.

BA 303 - Principles of International Business

BA 303 - Perspectives of International Business

An introductory course addressing the unique issues, challenges and opportunities in the global business community. The strengths and weaknesses of current developments and trends of business globalization are examined in a context of social, cultural, political, economic and environmental concerns.

Credits: 3
Class Restriction: Must be a Junior or Senior
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring, Every Summer

BA 320 - Leadership Theory and Practice

This course examines a wide range of leadership theories and practices in today’s organizational settings. The course addresses the strengths and criticisms, and practical aspects of various leadership approaches.

Credits: 3
Class Level Restriction: Junior
Term Offered: Every Fall

BA 330 - Tourism/Hospitality Management

BA 330 - Tourism/Hospitality Management

An introductory course covering the scope, organization, and environment of the domestic and international tourism and hospitality industry. Topics to be covered include industry components, supply and demand, motivation and sociology, economics, public policy and environmental issues, and current leadership and management challenges facing the industry.

Credits: 3
Class Level Restriction: Junior
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

BA 334 - Sustainable Tourism

BA 334 - Sustainable Tourism

This course provides a theoretical and practical understanding of sustainable tourism in developed and developing countries. The sustainable tourism movement is explored holistically in its application to the economic, environmental, and socio-cultural impacts of tourism. Case studies and projects with real world application consider how more appropriate forms of tourism can minimize negative impacts of tourism for future generations.

Credits: 3
Clock Hours - (Lect-Lab): (3-0)
Class Level Restriction: Junior
Term Offered: Every Fall

BA 362 - Cross-Cultural Management

BA 362 - Cross-Cultural Management

This cross-cultural management course allows students to gain perspectives and real world applications in global business using knowledge from multiple disciplines and diverse cultural topics. Students examine the opportunities and challenges in different regions in an ever-changing global business world.

Credits: 3
Class Level Restriction: Junior
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring, Every Summer

BA 374 - Strategic Business Communications

BA 374 - Strategic Business Communications 

This course examines the conceptual frameworks and specific tools for communicating in complex environments and accomplishing strategic academic and professional business goals. This core course addresses the written, oral, visual and interpersonal communication skills necessary for the professional environment.

Credits: 3
Class Restriction: Must be a Junior or Senior
Term Offered: Every Spring, Fall 2019

BA 380 - Principles of Finance

BA 380 - Principles of Finance 

An introductory course focusing on financial analysis and decision-making, including time value of money, valuation of stocks, bonds and other securities, investment risk management, capital budgeting, cost of capital and long- and short-term financing for firms competing in a global business environment.

Credits: 3
Class Restriction: Must be a Junior or Senior
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring, Every Summer

BA 385 - Risky Decisions

BA 385 - Risky Decisions

This course examines the relationship between decisions and risk in the business enterprise. Spreadsheet models using decision trees, Monte Carlo Simulation, and other various modeling techniques form the basis for examining these relationships. Probability concepts and Palisade Decision Tools software such as Precision Tree and @Risk are used as primary analysis tools in Excel to model the decision-risk relationship. 

Credits: 3
Class Level Restriction: Junior
Term Offered: Fall 2018, Fall 2019

CRIM 361 - Deviance

CRIM 361 - Deviance

An examination of the traditional definitions of deviance followed by contemporary critiques which emphasize labeling theory and the more sociological approaches to understanding human conduct.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall

CRIM 363 - Crime and Youth

CRIM 363 - Crime and Youth

This course examines youth in relation to the U.S. juvenile justice system, with attention to policies that push specific youth out of school to be targets for incarceration. The school to prison pipeline, stigmatization and criminalization of youth, and youth justice and empowerment programs and policies will be central themes of this course.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall

CRIM 364 - Crime and Punishment

CRIM 364 - Crime and Punishment

This course will provide a historical overview of punitive justice and the U.S. criminal justice system from a critical criminology perspective. Students will be introduced to perspectives on crime grounded in various theoretical perspectives and using specific case examples.  

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall

ENGL 250 - Practicum: Indy/Indy Online

ENGL 250 - Practicum: Indy/Indy Online

Directed experience for lower- and upper-division students in news work on the FLC Independent and Indy Online.

Credits: 1-6
Hours: 50 hours are the equivalent of one credit hour.
Permissions Required: Instructor
Repeatable: This course is repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits.
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring
Notes: There is a course specific fee for this course.

ENGL 251 - Practicum: KDUR/Audio

ENGL 251 - Practicum: KDUR/Audio

Directed experience for lower- and upper-division students in audio production and radio broadcasting in affiliation with KDUR, the college-community radio station.

Credits: 1-6
Hours: 50 hours are the equivalent of one credit hour.
Permissions Required: Instructor
Repeatable: This course is repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits.
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring
Notes: There is a course specific fee for this course.

ENGL 343 - British Literature Topics: The Romantic Hero

ENGL 343 - British Literature Topics: The Romantic Hero

An in-depth study of selected British writings from the beginnings to 1800.

Credits: 3
Clock Hours - (Lect-Lab): (3-0)
Repeatable: This course is repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits provided the topics are different.
Term Offered: Fall 2019, Fall 2021

ENGL 346 - American Literature Topics: American Fiction Since 1970

ENGL 346 - American Literature Topics: American Fiction Since 1970

An in-depth study of selected American writings from 1900 to the present.

Credits: 3
Repeatable: This course is reapeatable for a maximum of 6 credits provided the topics are different.
Term Offered: Every Fall

ENT 306 - Business Creativity & Innovation

ENT 306 - Business Creativity & Innovation

This course examines the chronological and conceptual history of visual communication. Students investigate relationships between design, political and cultural conditions, and technological developments. Outcomes include an understanding of the history of visual communication in contemporary life and awareness about the future of the field.

Credits: 3
Class Level Restriction: Sophomore
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ES 300 - Sport in Film

ES 300 - Sport in Film

This course will take a conceptual and sociological look at sport through its films both contemporary and classic. Viewings, discussions, debates, critical reviews and writings will be used to explore the themes, issues and methods used in selected films and the interrelationships of sport, human movement, society and film.

Credits: 2
Class Level Restriction: Sophomore
Term Offered: Fall 2018

ES 303 - Gender and Sport

ES 303 - Gender and Sport

This course examines the intersection of culturally based gender systems with the system of sport on various competitive levels. History of sport and Title IX, relative to women’s emergence into athletics, and the commonallities and differences of men’s and women’s experiences in sport will be explored. Course content and its connections will be gained through reading, discussion, research, and shared experience.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: FLC Writing Placement Score C250 OR successful completion of COMP 150
Class Level Restriction: Junior
Term Offered: Fall 2018

GSS 300 - Masculinities

GSS 300 - Masculinities 

This interdisciplinary course moves away from the axiom that masculinity is exclusively aligned with men. Students will examine the ways in which ideas of masculinity have been utilized by different populations to create structures of power and thought, organize societies, perform gender, and transgress traditional notions of masculinity (e.g., female masculinities). This seminar emphasizes critical thinking and independent research.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Fall 2019, Fall 2022

GEOG 310 - Intro to Computer Mapping and GIS

GEOG 310 - Intro to Computer Mapping and GIS

An introduction to mapping concepts and technologies using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Lectures will focus on map use and analysis, georeferencing, cartographic communication, and geospatial data visualization. Hands-on lab assignments will focus on map skills, interpretation, symbology and design using ArcGIS software, and include the use of Global Positioning System (GPS) units for navigation and data collection.

Credits: 4
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

HIST 313 - Wilderness in America

HIST 313 - Wilderness in America

Course focuses on specialized historic concepts while tracing the history of wilderness on American public lands, beginning in the 1600s to the establishment of the federal wilderness preservation system in 1964. Students read history, literature and science and come to understand difficult and sometimes unfamiliar issues in managing wilderness areas today.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: (COMP 150 OR one CO2 course OR FLC Writing Placement Score 250) AND one HI1 course Details: CO2 course list: COMP 250, COMP 252, COMP 253, ENGL 268, SOC 210 Details: HI1 course list: HIST 150, HIST 151, HIST 160, HIST 181, HIST 261, HIST 270, HIST 271, HIST 280, HIST 281, NAIS 123
Term Offered: Every Fall

HIST 332 - Women in the United States

HIST 332 - Women in the United States

This course examines women’s experiences, changing gender roles, and sexuality from the colonial period to the present. The course considers such issues as work, friendship and family, reproduction, and the struggles for equality. The influence of class, race and ethnicity on women’s experiences will also be considered.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: (COMP 150 OR one CO2 course OR FLC Writing Placement Score 250) AND one HI1 course Details: CO2 course list: COMP 250, COMP 252, COMP 253, ENGL 268, SOC 210 Details: HI1 course list: HIST 150, HIST 151, HIST 160, HIST 181, HIST 261, HIST 270, HIST 271, HIST 280, HIST 281, NAIS 123
Term Offered: Fall 2019

HIST 345 - Archival Theory and Practice

HIST 345 - Archival Theory and Practice

Course exposes students to high-level, specialized concepts about Archive work building on prior Public History coursework. The course examines ways of storing, accessing, and selectively preserving data. Students examine the theoretical foundations behind Archival work, then engage that knowledge through practical application by doing actual archival work at the Center for Southwest Studies collection.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: (COMP 150 OR one CO2 course OR FLC Writing Placement Score 250) AND one HI1 course Details: CO2 course list: COMP 250, COMP 252, COMP 253, ENGL 268, SOC 210 Details: HI1 course list: HIST 150, HIST 151, HIST 160, HIST 181, HIST 261, HIST 270, HIST 271, HIST 280, HIST 281, NAIS 123
Term Offered: Fall 2019

HIST 375 - Latin America: The Maya - Past & Present

HIST 375 - Latin America: The Maya - Past & Present

Course will examine a particular time and topic in Latin American history, utilizing the most recent research and findings to keep students up-to-date and current in a specialized field, thus, course content will vary. Students will develop higher-level, specialized historical skills.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: (COMP 150 OR one CO2 course OR FLC Writing Placement Score 250) AND one HI1 course Details: CO2 course list: COMP 250, COMP 252, COMP 253, ENGL 268, SOC 210 Details: HI1 course list: HIST 150, HIST 151, HIST 160, HIST 181, HIST 261, HIST 270, HIST 271, HIST 280, HIST 281, NAIS 123
Term Offered: Fall 2019

HIST 379 - Modern Europe

HIST 379 - Modern Europe

This course will examine the transnational history of Europe since the 1700s, possibly including focus on revolution, nationalism, war, and cultural, intellectual, and/or political developments (such as the Enlightenment).

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: (COMP 150 OR one CO2 course OR FLC Writing Placement Score 250) AND one HI1 course Details: CO2 course list: COMP 250, COMP 252, COMP 253, ENGL 268, SOC 210 Details: HI1 course list: HIST 150, HIST 151, HIST 160, HIST 181, HIST 261, HIST 270, HIST 271, HIST 280, HIST 281, NAIS 123
Term Offered: Fall 2019

MU 331 - Music History I

MU 331 - Music History I

Study of the history of music from classical antiquity to 1750.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Fall 2018

MU 339 - Scenes from the Musical Stage

MU 339 - Scenes from the Musical Stage

Study and performance of the opera, operetta, and musical theater repertoire through fully staged ensemble scenes.

Credits: 1
Repeatable: This course is repeatable for a maximum of 12 credits.
Term Offered: Every Fall

MU 342 - Topics in Music Business

MU 342 - Topics in Music Business 

Topics in Music Business will introduce students to the business aspects of the music industry including profit and non-profit arts organizations, grant writing, fund-raising, management, concert production, and the recording industry. Area arts professionals will be invited as guest lecturers. Students will create a mock organization and develop all aspects of the business for a final project.

Credits: 2
Term Offered: Fall 2019, Fall 2021

NAIS 333 - Indigenous Identity

NAIS 333 - Indigenous Identity

This course studies the racialization of indigeneity through time and place and seeks to understand the ways in which individuals, communities, and tribal nations have developed their own sense of Indigenous identity, been shaped by the dominant society, and informed by various policies governing identity within and beyond the boundaries of the United States.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: One CO2 course CO2 course list: COMP 250, COMP 252 COMP 253, ENGL 268, SOC 210
Term Offered: Fall 2019

NAIS 366 - Native American Art and Culture

NAIS 366 - Native American Art and Culture

Using a regional approach, this course examines traditional and contemporary art made by Indigenous Peoples of North America. The influence of tourism, photography, and museums on these art forms is also examined. This course also introduces, through hands-on projects, many of the traditional art forms studied.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: One CO2 course CO2 course list: COMP 250, COMP 252, COMP 253, ENGL 268, SOC 210
Term Offered: Fall 2019

PHIL 364 - Political Philosophy

PHIL 364 - Political Philosophy

This course examines the justification and limitation of the authority of government and other social institutions. What is the basis of governmental authority? When is it permissible for a government to use force against its citizens? Students in this course critically examine the work of influential thinkers such as Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, Mill, and Rawls.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Spring 2020, Spring 2022

PHIL 370 - Philosophical Analysis

PHIL 370 - Philosophical Analysis

A focused cultivation of the skill of evaluating arguments embedded in English prose. While the topic varies, the training provided by the course does not. Students learn to identify premises and conclusions in philosophical arguments and apply methods from logic to evaluate the quality of these arguments.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: PHIL 271 
Repeatable: This course is repeatable for a maximum of 9 credits provided the topics are different.
Term Offered: Fall 2019, Fall 2021

PHIL 386 - Skepticism & Knowledge

PHIL 386 - Skepticism & Knowledge

This course explores the nature and extent of our knowledge of the world, raising fundamental questions about justification and truth. The skeptical denial of knowledge is confronted; defenses of knowledge are essayed. The course surveys empirical studies of how our thinking often goes wrong and how we can guard against these widespread and largely unconscious errors.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Fall 2020

PHIL 389 - 19th and 20th Century Philosophy

PHIL 389 - 19th and 20th Century Philosophy

This is the third course in a three-course sequence in the history of philosophy, covering the 19th & 20th centuries. The course will begin with primary sources from major thinkers in the 19th century, such as Hegel, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Marx, and Mill, and move on to representatives of both the analytic and continental traditions of the 20th century.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: It is recommended that you have finished a CO2 (Composition) class. 
Term Offered: Fall 2019, Fall 2021

PHIL 481 - Philosophy and Nature of Reality

PHIL 481 - Philosophy and Nature of Reality 

This course explores questions about ultimate reality: What exists? Why is there something rather than nothing? What makes something possible or necessary? Do humans have free will? Is freedom compatible with determinism? What am I? Is there life after death? What makes the future different from the past? What does it mean for one thing to cause another?

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: It is recommended to have completed a CO2 course (Composition) before taking.
Term Offered: Fall 2019, Fall 2022

PS 302 - Topics: International Law

PS 302 - Topics: International Law

This course offers in-depth exploration of special topics in the study of courts and the law. Course content will vary. Specific topic will be announced by the instructor when the course is offered.

Credits: 3
Repeatable: This course is repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits provided the topics are different.
Term Offered: Every Spring, Fall 2019, Fall 2021

PS 325 - Middle East Politics

PS 325 - Middle East Politics

Religion is one important vehicle for mobilizing people to engage politically with government and other citizens. The focus of this course is on the role religion plays as a justification for political participation, public policy advocacy, and even violence in the U.S. and around the world.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Fall 2018, Spring 2019, Spring 2020

PS 390 - Congress vs. the Presidency

PS 390 - Congress vs. the Presidency

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Fall 2019

SOC 321 - Sociology Topics: Social Poetry

SOC 321 - Sociology Topics: Social Poetry

This course addresses contemporary topics and subfields within the discipline of sociology. Course content will vary. Topics may include but are not limited to Cuisine & World Hunger, Comparative Societies, Social Poetry, or the study of anarchism.

Credits: 3
Repeatable: This course is repeatable for a maximum of 12 credits provided the topics are different.
Term Offered: Every Spring, Every Summer

SOC 353 - Medical Sociology

SOC 353 - Medical Sociology

A study of the social practices and beliefs that define and constitute the phenomena of health and illness. The current health care delivery system, the social construction of illness and the role of being a patient will be critically reviewed. Alternative cultural perspectives on health and illness will be explored.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Fall 2019

SOC 400 - Native American Law and Politics

SOC 400 - Native American Law and Politics

A sociological study of the history of the political and legal changes that have shaped the contours of contemporary Federal Indian Law and the laws and governing systems of various Indian tribes. This course will also examine this history against emerging international human rights principles.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Fall 2019

THEA 322 - Creative Dramatics

THEA 322 - Creative Dramatics 

This course focuses on leading groups in the creation of improvised drama in order to strengthen the performer, rather than the performance. The improvisation is designed to develop communication and problem solving skills, to develop and maintain good physical and mental health, and to explore our understanding the external world by clarifying values and verbalizing hopes and beliefs.

Credits: 3
Class Restriction: Must be a Sophomore, Junior, or Senior
Term Offered: Fall 2019, Fall 2021

THEA 360 - Dance Techniques: Advanced Jazz Dance

THEA 360 - Dance Techniques: Advanced Jazz Dance

This course offers students the opportunity to develop further the techniques of jazz dance in application, criticism and performance.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Fall 2019, Fall 2020

THEA 415 - Devised and Performance Art

THEA 415 - Devised and Performance Art

This course traces the history, tradition, practice and aesthetics of 20th and 21st century performance, live, multimedia, and devised art. Examining new ways of authoring performance with multiple artists (designers, writers, performers, etc.), students will be exposed to a variety of creative processes in solo and ensemble performance and incorporate the tools necessary in the creation of original work.

Credits: 3
Class Restriction: Must be a Junior or Senior
Term Offered: Fall 2019, Fall 2021