Office of Student Success - Free Electives for Spring

Important Dates

  • Tuesday, May 15 (Census Date)
    • Deadline to add or drop summer courses 
    • Deadline for dropping individual course without a recorded grade
  • Deadline to withdraw from an individual summer course
    • See the Registrar's Website (dates vary per course)
  • Sunday, August 26th
    • Last day to withdraw with no academic financial penalty (other fees may still apply)
  • Monday, August 27th
    • Fall classes begin   
  • Tuesday, September 11th (Census Date) 
    • Deadline to add or drop fall courses
    • Deadline for dropping individual classes without a recorded grade
    • Deadline for Application for Graduation 
Free Elective Options for Spring 2019

Free electives are courses outside your major, minor, and Liberal Arts Core. These are classes that count towards your overall graduation total but do not have to lead to higher coursework and are not required for your degree path.

The first list is classes that do not have prerequisites or class standing requirements. These classes are for any students needing a free elective in the Spring 2019 semester. You can click on the class to see a summary, the number of credits you'll earn from the class, and any other notes or extra information.

The second list is classes that have prerequisites, class standing requirements, or a more advanced courseload. These classes are primarily for upperclassmen (juniors and seniors) unless you have fulfilled the requirements of the class you're interested in. You can click on the class to see a summary, the number of credits you'll earn from the class, the required prerequisites, and any other notes or extra information.

Not sure if a free elective is the right choice for you or will fit with your schedule? Schedule an appointment with your advisor or stop by Walk-In Advising to talk about your options.

Lower division coursework, no prerequisites

ANTH 151 - Introduction to Anthropology

ANTH 151 - Introduction to Anthropology

This course provides a comprehensive introductory study of general anthropology covering the four major subfields (biological, linguistic, archaeological and sociocultural). It also addresses the ways that knowledge gained in the four subfields may be applied to solving real-world problems.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring
Notes: This class also counts as a Liberal Arts Core Social Science (SS) course.

ANTH 201 - Introduction to Archaeology

ANTH 201 - Introduction to Archaeology

This course is designed to introduce the beginning student to the basic techniques, concepts, and theories of archaeology and its relation to the wider field of anthropology.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ANTH 210 - Sociocultural Anthropology

ANTH 210 - Sociocultural Anthropology

Sociocultural anthropology deals with the relationship of culture to society and the individual. This course is designed for the beginning student and introduces the basic concepts, theories and methods of this broad field. It also looks at the application of ethnological thought in considering modern human realities and problems and in understanding the relationship of cultural and expressive forms to identity.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Fall 2018, Fall 2019, Spring 2020
Notes: This class also counts as a Liberal Arts Core Social Science (SS).

ART 112 - 2D Design

ART 112 - 2D Design

This course introduces two-dimensional design elements and principles, color theory and practice. Students will investigate diverse materials and techniques for effective visual communication. Critical thinking and conceptual problems are explored.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring
Notes: There is a course specific fee for this course.

BA 110 - Introduction to Business Decision Making

BA 110 - Introduction to Business Decision Making

An introduction to the professional expectations, responsibilities and global opportunities in business. The course will introduce the disciplines (Economics, Accounting and Finance, Management, Marketing, Data Analysis, and Ethics) which are involved in business decision making as well as the techniques used in such decision making.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

BA 131 - Intro to Resort Management

BA 131 - Intro to Resort Management

An introductory course covering the scope, organization, and environment of resort operations. The course focuses on an analysis of the physical, financial and human variables involved in the operation of a destination resort. 

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Spring 2019
Notes: This course is the first in a series of 12 credits required for a certificate in ski operations.

BA 205 - New Business Venturing

BA 205 - New Business Venturing

This course introduces students to starting and operating a business. At the macro level, students are exposed to how business interacts with government, financial institutions and society. At the micro level, students are exposed to customer psychology, basic economics, data analysis and interpretation. Individual research and writing a business plan are required. Other topics covered include franchising, home-based businesses and e-commerce.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ED 222 - Education: Global Perspectives

ED 222 - Education: Global Perspectives

Students in this course will study the social, philosophical, cultural, and intellectual foundations of “schooling” and “education” as they have evolved over time. Students will engage in research, discussions, and classroom activities that are directly related to American and international education. Students will write and critically think about topics related to education practice in this culturally diverse world.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ENGL 181 - Applied Grammar

ENGL 181 - Applied Grammar

A basic overview of standard English grammar and usage. 

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Spring 2019

ENGL 206 - Introduction to Media Production

ENGL 206 - Intro to Media Production

This course will introduce students to the production process, including video, audio, and new media elements. Students will use production equipment to learn scripting, visualization, producing, and editing through hands-on experience.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring
Notes: There is a course specific fee for this course.

ENGL 219 - Current Events & Trends in Media

ENGL 264 - Introduction to Creative Writing

ENGL 264 - Intro to Creative Writing

This creative writing course will introduce various genres of writing, such as poetry, fiction or creative non-fiction.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ENGL 270 - History of the Film

ENGL 270 - History of the Film

An overview of the history of international and Hollywood narrative films.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ENVS 100 - Introduction to Environmental Studies

ENVS 100 - Intro to Environmental Studies

Introduces students to interdisciplinary thinking and problem-solving in service to ecological sustainability and human well-being. By focusing on the interrelationships among science, technology, society and the arts, students explore a broad perspective of what it means for humans to affect, and be affected by, natural and built environments.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ES 101 - Basic Prevention & Treatment of Athletic Injuries

ES 101 - Basic Prevention & Treatment of Athletic Injuries

This is an introductory course into the field of coaching. Emphasis is placed on recognition of the etiology, mechanism of injury, signs and symptoms, and management of common athletic injuries of the lower extremity. Knowledge of these areas will provide the coach with the tools to prevent, better recognize, and properly manage athletic injuries. 

Credits: 3
Terms Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ES 136 - Sports Officiating

ES 136 - Sports Officiating

This course is designed to provide an in-depth understanding of the rules, mechanics and training that sports officials undergo. Students taking this course will demonstrate how to interact with officials, and will be introduced to how an official should interact with coaches and spectators. Upon completion of the course, students will be properly trained to begin officiating sports, including but not limited to baseball, softball, soccer, football and track and field.

Credits: 2

ES 165 - Community First Aid & Safety

ES 165 - Community First Aid & Safety

Study and practice of first aid/CPR procedures in handling common injuries, accidents and medical emergencies.

Credits: 2
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring
Notes: There is a course specific fee for this course.

ES 185 - Introduction to Coaching: ASEP

ES 185 - Intro to Coaching: ASEP

This introductory course is the American Sport Education Program’s “Coaching Principles Course.” It covers the areas of coaching philosophy, sport psychology, sport pedagogy, sport physiology, sport management and sport-specific planning. The course covers what is important for a coach to know and presents the material in a manner that is of practical value to a coach. A series of videotapes helps create an atmosphere of discussion that gives students practical ways of handling coach/player relationships and situations. The student who passes the ASEP exam will receive certification which is rapidly becoming the required coaching certification.

Credits: 2
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

ES 201 - Techniques of Strength and Conditioning Development

ES 201 - Techniques of Strength and Conditioning Development

This class with enable the learner to coach a high school or collegiate strength and conditioning program. Lectures will cover the essential knowledge of program design along with the managerial skills needed to coach athletes of all levels. The guided practice section will allow students to apply and demonstrate the learned material.

Credits: 2

ES 225 - Techniques of Coaching Football

ES 225 - Techniques of Coaching Football

Classroom instruction directed toward the various phases of American football; history, defensive theory, strategy, personnel, offensive theory, the kicking game, practice organization, relationship and influence of teachers, parents, booster clubs and news media.

Credits: 2
Terms Offered: Every Spring

ES 229 - Techniques of Coaching Track and Field

ES 229 - Techniques of Coaching Track & Field

Designed to teach methods, techniques, and principles of coaching all events in track and field at both the high school and college levels.

Credits: 2
Term Offered: Every Spring

ES 230 - Techniques of Coaching Softball

ES 230 - Techniques of Coaching Softball

The study of history, strategies, rules, methods and organization involved in coaching softball. Both theoretical and practical applications will be developed. 

Credits: 2
Terms Offered: Every Spring

ES 231 - Techniques of Coaching Soccer

ES 231 - Techniques of Coaching Soccer

The study of principles, methods, techniques and strategies involved in coaching soccer.

Credits: 2
Terms Offered: Every Spring

ES 244 - Exercise Epidemiology & Health

ES 244 - Exercise Epidemiology & Health

Introduces students to epidemiological method that are relevant to the study of physical activity. Basic epidemiological issues and methods pertinent to the study of physical activity are presented. Also provides an introduction to designing evidence-based behavior interventions with the potential to reduce risk of chronic diseases. Relationships between physical activity and physical and psychological health outcomes will be examined.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

HIST 255 - Intro to Heritage Preservation

HIST 255 - Intro to Heritage Preservation

Course will explore what Heritage Preservation means and how it is unique within the field of Public History. This course also introduces students to various career paths in public history, archives, museums, and interpretation within federal agencies such as the U.S. Forest Service, the National Parks Service, the Bureau of Lane Management and tribal cultural preservation programs.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Spring 2019

MU 105 - Concert Choir

MU 105 - Concert Choir

Thorough study and performance each trimester of larger choral compositions. Open to all students. Course is repeatable. 

Credit: 1
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

MU 110 - Band

MU 110 - Band

Designed to provide every student who plays a musical instrument the opportunity to pursue his or her musical interests. A variety of musical literature will be provided as well as the opportunity to perform in concert both on campus and on tour. Open to all students. Course is repeatable. 

Credit: 1
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

MU 117 - Symphony Orchestra

MU 117 - Symphony Orchestra

Offered in conjunction with the San Juan Symphony Orchestra at no extra fee. This course provides an opportunity for the study and performance of major orchestral works. Two hours of rehearsal are held on Tuesday evenings and the third is arranged at the convenience of the instructor and students. Open to all string students; wind and percussion students by audition only. Course is repeatable. Consent of instructor. 

Credit: 1
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

PE - Any Physical Education class up to PE 1700

Options for Spring 2019:

  • PE 1370 - Fitness - Walking
  • PE 1380 - Fitness - Weight Training
  • PE 1390 - Fitness - Yoga
  • PE 1410 - Backpacking & Camping
  • PE 1422 - Desert Mountain Biking
  • PE 1430 - Day - Hiking
  • PE 1450 - Kayaking - Beginning
  • PE 1481 - Skiing - Cross Country
  • PE 1520 - Badminton
  • PE 1530 - Basketball
  • PE 1622 - Ultimate Frisbee/Team Handball

Credit: 1

PS 290 - Democracy and Dictatorship

PS 290 - Democracy and Dictatorship

A comparison of democracy and dictatorship with an emphasis on the dynamics of revolution and regime change.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Spring 2019

SOC 200 - Social Change

SOC 200 - Social Change

This course is designed to facilitate critical understanding of, and commitment to, processes of social change in modern society. Using historical and theoretical analysis of social change efforts, students are encouraged to embrace and develop models of change that take seriously the personal and social dimensions of human struggle.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

SOC 230 - Resiliency and Society

SOC 230 - Resiliency and Society

Resiliency is the ability of a system to rebound after shock or disruption. This course will explore strategies to encourage resiliency in individuals and families dealing with social problems, communities facing environmental or economic shock, and ecological systems facing issues such as drought, climate change, and invasive species.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

SPAN 102 - Elementary Spanish II

SPAN 102 - Elementary Spanish II

Further study of Spanish with emphasis on reading, composition, and conversation.

Credits: 4
Term Offered: Every Spring

THEA 100 - Theatrical Production

THEA 100 - Theatrical Production

This course offers students interested in theatrical production the opportunity to apply foundational skills in the areas of technical theatre, performance, management and marketing. Students gain a working knowledge of skills necessary to stage a performance.

Credits: 1-3
Hours: 50 hours are the equivalent of one credit hour.
Repeatable: This course is repeatable for a maximum of 12 credits.
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring
Notes: There is a course specific fee for this course.

THEA 138 - Acting Techniques I

THEA 138 - Acting Techniques I

This course introduces students to basic performance techniques including bodywork, voice, characterization, audition techniques, and beginning text analysis through scene and monologue work.

Credits: 4
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

Upper division/upperclassmen coursework

ACC 225 - Introduction to Financial Accounting

ACC 225 - Introduction to Financial Accounting

The first of a two-course sequence in basic accounting, this course emphasizes the preparation, understanding and analysis of the standard financial statements for the purpose of making informed business decisions. Topics covered also include the processing of transactions through the accounting cycle, generally accepted accounting principles, and the role of accounting in business.

Credits: 3
Class Level Restriction: Sophomore
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring, Every Summer

ANTH 365 - Language and Culture

ANTH 365 - Language and Culture

This course introduces students to the relationship between language and culture. Attention will be paid to a diversity of human communicative behavior, both spoken and unspoken, with a focus upon aspects of communication as the structural properties of language, cross-cultural variations in language use, the contextualization of meaning, and how language is affected by such variables as gender identity and group affiliation. 

Credits: 3
Terms Offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2021, Spring 2023

ART 315 - Gallery Management

ART 351 - Ceramics

ART 351 - Ceramics

This course will introduce and develop the technical skills and knowledge of ceramic materials and processes including hand building, wheel throwing, surfacing, and firing.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring
Notes: There is a course specific fee for this course.

ART 366 - Gender and Representation

ART 366 - Gender & Representation

This course invites students to think critically about the roles images play in constructing or deconstructing our concepts of gender. Drawing from contemporary cultural and gender theory, it surveys a diverse range of visuals from mass media to high art. Students build a historically and culturally nuanced understanding of gender as a central issue in visual representation.

Credits: 3
Class Restriction: Must be a Sophomore
Terms Offered: Spring

BA 303 - Perspectives of International Business

BA 303 - Perspectives of International Business

An introductory course addressing the unique issues, challenges and opportunities in the global business community. The strengths and weaknesses of current developments and trends of business globalization are examined in a context of social, cultural, political, economic, and environmental concerns.

Credits: 3
Class Level Restriction: Must be a Junior

BA 306 - Business Creativity & Innovation

BA 306 - Business Creativity & Innovation

This course examines the chronological and conceptual history of visual communication. Students investigate relationships between design, political and cultural conditions, and technological developments. Outcomes include an understanding of the history of visual communication in contemporary life and awareness about the future of the field.

Credits: 3
Class Level Restriction: Sophomore
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

BA 314 - Ethics and Social Responsibility

BA 314 - Ethics and Social Responsibility

This course will examine ethical and social responsibility issues which arise and are unique to managerial decision making in business settings. The coruse will proceed developmentally with ethical systems commonly used in business, personal ethics and, finally, ethics in business through case studies. 

Credits: 3
Class Level Restriction: Must be a Junior

BA 320 - Leadership Theory and Practice

This course examines a wide range of leadership theories and practices in today’s organizational settings. The course addresses the strengths and criticisms, and practical aspects of various leadership approaches.

Credits: 3
Class Level Restriction: Junior
Term Offered: Every Fall

BA 330 - Tourism/Hospitality Management

BA 330 - Tourism/Hospitality Management

An introductory course covering the scope, organization, and environment of the domestic and international tourism and hospitality industry. Topics to be covered include industry components, supply and demand, motivation and sociology, economics, public policy and environmental issues, and current leadership and management challenges facing the industry.

Credits: 3
Class Level Restriction: Junior
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring

BA 332 - Event Management

BA 332 - Event Management

An experiential course where students learn and apply principles of event development, operational planning, event implementation and evaluation strategies. Students will work in teams to execute an event with special attention to management concepts including funding, marketing, risk management, and quality control.

Credits: 3
Class Level Restriction: Must be a Junior

BA 380 - Principles of Finance

BA 380 - Principles of Finance

An introductory course focusing on financial analysis and decision-making, including time value of money, valuation of stocks, bonds and other securities, investment risk management, capital budgeting, cost of capital and long- and short-term financing for firms competing in a global business environment.

Credits: 3
Class Level Restriction: Junior

ECON 335 - Environment/Resource Economics

ECON 335 - Environment/Resource Economics

A course using economic analysis to explain the underlying behavioral causes of environmental and natural resource problems and to evaluate the policy responses to them. Topics include air and water pollution, the allocation of renewable and exhaustible resources, and sustainable development. 

Credits: 3
Class Level Restriction: Must be a Junior

ECON 379 - Readings in Economics

ECON 379 - Reading in Economics

In this course students will read a variety of current writings concerning economics and policy.

Credits: 3
Class Level Restriction: Must be a Junior

ENGL 250 - Practicum: Indy/Indy Online

ENGL 250 - Practicum: Indy/Indy Online

Directed experience for lower- and upper-division students in news work on the FLC Independent and Indy Online.

Credits: 1-6
Hours: 50 hours are the equivalent of one credit hour.
Permissions Required: Instructor
Repeatable: This course is repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits.
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring
Notes: There is a course specific fee for this course.

ENGL 251 - Practicum: KDUR/Audio

ENGL 251 - Practicum: KDUR/Audio

Directed experience for lower- and upper-division students in audio production and radio broadcasting in affiliation with KDUR, the college-community radio station.

Credits: 1-6
Hours: 50 hours are the equivalent of one credit hour.
Permissions Required: Instructor
Repeatable: This course is repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits.
Term Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring
Notes: There is a course specific fee for this course.

ENGL 308 - Interactive Media Production

ENGL 308 - Interactive Media Production

This course introduces students to interactive media production and non-linear storytelling. 

Credits: 3
Permissions Required: Instructor
Notes: There is a course specific fee for this course.

ENGL 315 - Media Writing: Narrative Journaling

ENGL 315 - Media Writing: Narrative Journaling

This course will prepare students for internships and future careers in their chosen media profession. This course will focus on in-depth instruction and practice in one or more media. Topics may include screenwriting, creative non-fiction, multi-media journalism and writing for the web and social media. 

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Spring 2019

ENGL 320 - The Novel

ENGL 320 - The Novel

An in-depth study of the history of the English, American, and European Novel and the genre of the novel beginning with works from the 18th century and concluding with works from the 21st century. 

Credits: 3
Terms Offered: Every Spring
 

ENGL 324 - Media Ethics

ENGL 324 - Media Ethics

This course will analyze multiple approaches to ethical decision-making in media industries such as journalism, advertising and public relations. Students will critically examine whether the media today are acting ethically. 

Credits: 3
Terms Offered: Spring 2019, Fall 2019, Fall 2021
 

ENGL 345 - American Literature Topics: American Romanticism

ENGL 345 - American Literature Topics: American Romanticism

An in-depth study of selected American writings the beginnings to 1900.

Credits: 3
Repeatable: This course is repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits provided the topics are different.
Term Offered: Every Spring

ENGL 380 - Native American Literature: Indigenous Novels and Film

ENGL 380 - Native American Literature: Indigenous Novels and Film

A study of traditional and contemporary Native American expression as seen through oration, tales and legends, chants and songs, poetry, drama, autobiography, and the novel. 

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Spring 2019

ENGL 432 - Shakespeare

ENGL 432 - Shakespeare

A study of Shakespearean drama. 

Credits: 3
Terms Offered: Every Spring

ENVS 393 - Topics: Environmental Archaeology

ENVS 393 - Topics: Environmental Archaeology

In-depth exploration of an environmental topic, such as, but not limited to climate change, coastal environments, environmental justice, environmental management, environmental movements, landscape studies, political ecology, or sustainable food systems.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Spring 2019
Prerequisites: Undergraduate level ENVS 100 Minimum Grade of D-

ES 337 - Sport Ethics

ES 337 - Sport Ethics

An inquiry into ethics and morality as these apply to sport and physical education. Students will engage in critical and reflective thinking about what values they believe should characterize competitive sports and the professions of athletics and physical education. Students will explore how they will respond to ethical dilemmas in sport and continue to develop their own moral reasoning ability.

Credits: 3
Class Level Restriction: Must be a Junior
Term Offered: Every Spring

GEOG 310 - Intro to Computer Mapping and GIS

GEOG 310 - Intro to Computer Mapping and GIS

An introduction to mapping concepts and technologies using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Lectures will focus on map use and analysis, georeferencing, cartographic communication, and geospatial data visualization. Hands-on lab assignments will focus on map skills, interpretation, symbology and design using ArcGIS software, and include the use of Global Positioning System (GPS) units for navigation and data collection. 

Credits: 4
Terms Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring
Note: This course has a course specific fee.

HIST 303 - Ancient Greece

HIST 303 - Ancient Greece

Course focuses on high-level, specialized concepts about the history of Ancient Greece. Course extends from early Aegean civilizations to Hellenistic Period. Topics include Minoans, Mycenaeans, Homeric Age, development of polis, contrasting city states of Athens and Sparta, rise and fall of classical Greece, ending with arrival of Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic world.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: (COMP 150 OR one CO2 course OR FLC Writing Placement Score 250) AND one HI1 course Details: CO2 course list: COMP 250, COMP 252, COMP 253, ENGL 268, SOC 210 Details: HI1 course list: HIST 150, HIST 151, HIST 160, HIST 181, HIST 261, HIST 270, HIST 271, HIST 280, HIST 281, NAIS 123
Term Offered: Spring 2019

HIST 320 - US West/Southwestern History

HIST 320 - US West/Southwestern History

Course focuses on and exposes students to concepts about the 19th-century American West using the theme of expansionism. Course examines interactions between cultures and people in the West, the forces that produced a unique section of the country, creation of the mystic West and its enduring legacy, and how the present is linked to the past in the trans-Mississippi West.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: (COMP 150 OR one CO2 course OR FLC Writing Placement Score 250) AND one HI1 course Details: CO2 course list: COMP 250, COMP 252, COMP 253, ENGL 268, SOC 210 Details: HI1 course list: HIST 150, HIST 151, HIST 160, HIST 181, HIST 261, HIST 270, HIST 271, HIST 280, HIST 281, NAIS 123
Term Offered: Spring 2019

HIST 323 - U.S. National Parks

HIST 323 - U.S. National Parks

Course begins with the 1916 National Park Service Act and then exposes students to specialized concepts and techniques central to understanding the evolution of the National Parks through history, science, archaeology, anthropology. Students apply knowledge and skills previously learned to unfamiliar topics and issues including national monuments, national recreation areas, and national seashores. Field Trips will be required.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: (COMP 150 OR one CO2 course OR FLC Writing Placement Score 250) AND one HI1 course Details: CO2 course list: COMP 250, COMP 252, COMP 253, ENGL 268, SOC 210 Details: HI1 course list: HIST 150, HIST 151, HIST 160, HIST 181, HIST 261, HIST 270, HIST 271, HIST 280, HIST 281, NAIS 123
Term Offered: Every Spring

HIST 329 - United States: Topics

HIST 329 - United States: Topics

Course examines a particular time and topic in United States history, utilizing the most recent research and findings to keep students up-to-date and current in a specialized field, thus, course content will vary. Students are expected to develop higher-level, specialized skills.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: (COMP 150 OR one CO2 course OR FLC Writing Placement Score 250) AND one HI1 course Details: CO2 course list: COMP 250, COMP 252, COMP 253, ENGL 268, SOC 210 Details: HI1 course list: HIST 150, HIST 151, HIST 160, HIST 181, HIST 261, HIST 270, HIST 271, HIST 280, HIST 281, NAIS 123
Term Offered: Spring 2019

HIST 372 - U.S.-Latin American Relations

HIST 372 - U.S.-Latin American Relations

Course examines developments of relationships between the United States and Latin American independence movements, Mexican War, United States economic expansion in late 19th century, Spanish American War, Panama Canal, United States involvement in Mexican and Cuban revolutions, effects of Cold War on relationships amont the countries of the Americas.

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: (COMP 150 OR one CO2 course OR FLC Writing Placement Score 250) AND one HI1 course Details: CO2 course list: COMP 250, COMP 252, COMP 253, ENGL 268, SOC 210 Details: HI1 course list: HIST 150, HIST 151, HIST 160, HIST 181, HIST 261, HIST 270, HIST 271, HIST 280, HIST 281, NAIS 123
Term Offered: Every Spring

HIST 374 - Topics: East European Communism

HIST 374 - Topics: East European Communism

Course will examine a particular time and topic in European history, utilizing the most recent research and findings to keep students up-to-date and current in a specialized field, thus, course content will vary. Students will develop higher-level, specialized historical skills. 

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: (COMP 150 OR one CO2 course OR FLC Writing Placement Score 250) AND one HI1 course Details: CO2 course list: COMP 250, COMP 252, COMP 253, ENGL 268, SOC 210 Details: HI1 course list: HIST 150, HIST 151, HIST 160, HIST 181, HIST 261, HIST 270, HIST 271, HIST 280, HIST 281, NAIS 123
Term Offered: Every Spring

MK 350 - Principles of Marketing

MK 350 - Principles of Marketing

This course introduces the principles of marketing activities such as the marketing of goods and services and ideas in both business and non-business organizations. There is an emphasis on concepts of marketing and their application in strategic planning and decision-making in dynamic domestic and international environments. Marketing principles are operationalized in a computer application market place simulation.

Credits: 3
Terms Offered: Every Fall, Every Spring
Class Level Restriction: Must be a Sophomore

MU 331 - Music History I

MU 332 - Music History II

Study of the history of music from 1750 through the 21st century.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Spring 2019
Class Level Restriction: Must be a Sophomore

MU 339 - Scenes from the Musical Stage

MU 339 - Scenes from the Musical Stage

Study and performance of the opera, operetta, and musical theater repertoire through fully staged ensemble scenes.

Credits: 1
Repeatable: This course is repeatable for a maximum of 12 credits.
Term Offered: Every Fall

NAIS 302 - History of NA Education & Current Trends

NAIS 317 - Indigenous People in Film and Media

NAIS 317 - Indigenous People in Film and Media

This course examines the representations of Indigenous People in film and media from an Indigenous perspective. Using a chronological and thematic approach, the course examines the reasons why Indigenous People are typically and atypically represented in film and media. The representations and cultural productions of Indigenous people in New Zealand, Australia and Canada are also included. 

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Spring 2019
Prerequisites: One CO2 course Details: CO2 course list: COMP 250, COMP 252, COMP 253, ENGL 268, SOC 210

NAIS 344 - Native American Oral Traditions

NAIS 344 - Native American Oral Traditions

Oral traditions and histories continue to serve as a means of preserving the collective wisdom of Indigenous nations and communities. Additionally, storytelling serves as a means of transmitting these oral narratives. This course focuses on ways in which various fields of study have approached documenting oral traditions and collaborated with indigenous nations and communities. 

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Spring 2019, Spring 2020, Spring 2022
Prerequisites: One CO2 course Details: CO2 course list: COMP 250, COMP 252, COMP 253, ENGL 268, SOC 210

PEAC 401 - Conflict Resolution Strategies

PEAC 401 - Conflict Resolution Strategies

As the capstone for the Peace Studies minor, this course discusses various conflict resolution strategies and provides students with opportunities to develop skills in peace building and distributive, integrative, and principled negotiation as well as a variety of mediation strategies ranging from traditional to transformative. Students gain hands-on experiences through role-playing and have opportunities to synthesize the content from their elective courses 

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Spring
Prerequisites: One CO2 course Details: CO2 course list: COMP 250, COMP 252, COMP 253, ENGL 268, SOC 210

PHIL 455 - Mind, Consciousness, & Language

PHIL 455 - Mind, Consciousness, & Language

This course explores the mystery of consciousness in a physical world, surveying theories of the relation of mind to body, the nature of consciousness, the possibility of artificial intelligence, and the relationship between throught and language. The problem of how minds represent reality and whether those representations are accurate is addressed through a study of theories of linguistic meaning.  

Credits: 3
Prerequisites: None. It is recommended that you have finished a CO2 (Composition) class. 
Term Offered: Spring 2019

PS 322 - International Political Economy

PS 322 - International Political Economy

A study of the interplay of economics and politics in the world arena. The course covers a wide range of political and economic issues and concepts, and introduces students to the many players at the international level (financial institutions, multinational organizations, nation-states, etc.). The course also provides a theoretical background to issues of political and economic interaction at the international level.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Spring

PS 337 - U.S. Foreign Policy

PS 337 - U.S. Foreign Policy

U.S. foreign policy is made and conducted in a thoroughly political environment. Within the context of the traditions of U.S. foreign policy and both the domestic and international political environment, students consider specific foreign policies, the governmental institutions responsible for formulating and implementing policies, and policy successes and failures.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Fall

PS 377 - Armed Conflict and Its Management

PS 377 - Armed Conflict and Its Management

This course will survey the central concepts and theoretical approaches to the study of armed conflict and the conditions necessary for peace in the current world context. Topics include the prevention and termination or armed conflict and the management of post-conflict peacebuilding processes. Students will analyze contemporary cases of armed conflict to evaluate the theories being examined.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Spring

SOC 321 - Sociology Topics: Community Development

SOC 321 - Sociology Topics: Community Development

This course addresses contemporary topics and subfields within the discipline of sociology. Course content will vary. Topics may include but are not limited to Cuisine & World Hunger, Comparative Societies, Social Poetry, or the study of anarchism

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Spring 2019

SOC 321 - Sociology Topics: Mexican Immigration of the 21st Century

SOC 321 - Sociology Topics: Mexican Immigration of the 21st Century

This course addresses contemporary topics and subfields within the discipline of sociology. Course content will vary. Topics may include but are not limited to Cuisine & World Hunger, Comparative Societies, Social Poetry, or the study of anarchism.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Spring 2019

SOC 350 - Social Construction of Sexuality

SOC 350 - Social Construction of Sexuality

This course will examine how sexuality is historically and culturally specific and situated within a complex web of politics, economics, culture, and social life. Through theoretical and critical discussions about desire, indentity, embodiment, stratification, politics, and power and privilege, the course will critically engage with essentialist and biological determinist perspectives regarding sexuality.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Spring 2019

SOC 365 - Criminology: Transformation & Healing

SOC 365 - Criminology: Transformation & Healing

This course examines alternatives to punitive justice from a critical criminology perspective. This course will provide students with practical skills and knowledge about mediation, conflict transformation, transformative justice, restorative justice, peace building/making, community circles, negotiation, and other nonwestern, non-punitive practices to address issues of crime, conflict, and harm. This course will stress the importance of accountability, healing, and transformation.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Spring 2019

SOC 366 - Criminology Topics: Narco Culture

SOC 366 - Criminology Topics: Narco Culture

This course will vary in topic, but will be based in critical theory and practices that challenge punitive justice. Grounded in social justice and inclusion, this course will discuss cutting-edge current affairs within the field of criminology. The purpose of special topics is for students to be informed on the latest issues emerging within the field of criminology.

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Spring 2019

SOC 384 - Sustainability: Soil & Society

SOC 384 - Sustainability: Soil & Society

This course will present contemporary topics related to understanding the relationship between society and the biophysical world. Examples of topics include Worldviews and Ecology, End of Oil, Environmental Justice, and Eco-Ability Studies. 

Credits: 3
Term Offered: Every Spring