Faculty Experts

Dr. Lorien Chambers Schuldt

Dr. Lorien Chambers Schuldt
Assistant Professor of Teacher Education


  • Elementary literacy development
  • Reading and writing instruction
  • Culturally and linguistically diverse students
  • Classroom discourse
  • Feedback and formative assessment


  • Ph.D., Curriculum and Teacher Education, Stanford University, 2014 
  • B.A., American Studies, Wellesley College, 1999 


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Dr. Lorien Chambers Schuldt is available to comment on topics related to areas of interest or expertise. If you need further assistance, contact Public Affairs at 970-247-7401 or by email.

About Dr. Lorien Chambers Schuldt

Lorien Chambers Schuldt is an assistant professor in the Department of Teacher Education at Fort Lewis College. She joined the college in 2014. In the Teacher Leadership program Professor Schuldt teaches and advises on topics related to assessment, instructional coaching and teacher learning, classroom literacy instruction, and language development. Chambers Schuldt’s research focuses on fostering rich literacy instruction in classrooms, particularly for students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.  Other research interests include teachers’ and students’ understandings of instructional practices and ways to support teachers in developing classroom discourse practices.  Her newest research focuses on practicing teachers’ evolving perceptions of teacher leadership.  Prior to joining the faculty at Fort Lewis College, Chambers Schuldt was a doctoral student instructor at Stanford University and an elementary school teacher in California and Colorado for almost ten years.  She also spent time in Mexico and New Zealand exploring family and teacher expectations in indigenous communities, and ways schools can support literacy development for emergent bilinguals. 
Chambers Schuldt serves as the Culturally Linguistically Diverse (CLD) coordinator at Fort Lewis College. In the community, she is a founding leader of the Culturally, Linguistically, and Economically Marginalized Working Group. She has served as a manuscript reviewer for Language Arts Journal (from the National Council of Teachers of English) and the Literacy Research Association Yearbook, as well as a proposal reviewer for the American Educational Research Association and the Literacy Research Association. Chambers Schuldt is a member of several professional associations, including the American Educational Research Association, the Literacy Research Association, Higher Educators in Linguistically Diverse Education, the National Council for Teachers of English, and the Colorado Association of Bilingual Education. 

Selected Presentations and Publications

Aukerman, M., Chambers Schuldt, L., Aiello, L. & Martin, P. (2017) “What meaning-making means among us:  The textual intercomprehending of emergent bilinguals in small-group text discussions.”  Harvard Education Review, 87(4), 482-511.

Aukerman, M., Johnson, E.M., & Chambers Schuldt, L. (2017) “Reciprocity of Student and Teacher Discourse Practices in Monologically and Dialogically Organized Text Discussion.” Journal of Language and Literacy Education, 13(2), 1-52.

Chambers Schuldt, L. (2017).  “A Balancing Act: Supporting Emergent Bilinguals in Writing Instruction.”  Paper presented at the Literacy Research Association conference in Tampa, FL in December 2017.

Cannella, C. & Chambers Schuldt, L. (2017).  "Nowhere to go": What Teachers Have to Say About Teacher Leadership Policy in Practice.”  Paper presented at the Critical Questions in Education Conference; New Orleans, LA in March, 2017.

Chambers Schuldt, L. (2016)  “Understanding the Feedback Teachers Give: A Look at Teachers’ Epistemologies around Writing Instruction and Feedback.”  Roundtable paper presented at the 2016 American Educational Research Association Conference; Washington, D.C.

Cohen, J., Chambers Schuldt, L., Brown, L., & Grossman, P. (2016). “Uptake of ambitious instructional practices: Exploring variability in appropriation of PLATO practices.”  Teachers College Record, 118(11), 1-36.