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Renowned educator gives back to teaching

Aspiring teachers received a big boost thanks to Durango teaching legend and Old Fort alumna Roberta Barr.

In early 2016, the Robert M. Barr & Roberta Armstrong Barr Foundation, a long-time supporter of teacher education at Fort Lewis College, gave $1.4 million for student scholarships in the Teacher Education Department. Theirs is the largest cash gift ever given to FLC.

The Barr Foundation has been a strong supporter of teacher education at Fort Lewis College for 15 years. Since it was formed in 2001, the foundation has given hundreds of thousands of dollars for student scholarships to FLC.

Roberta grew up in the Animas Valley, attending a one-room schoolhouse in Hermosa before graduating from Durango High School in 1931. Roberta attended Fort Lewis in Hesperus. She then taught for decades in the region, eventually becoming principal of Durango's Park and Mason elementary schools.

The Barrs lived, worked, and served in southwestern Colorado for most of their lives. Robert was a rancher, farmer, and beekeeper. Their gift keeps that legacy and commitment alive.

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